From the Auricon Sound Yahoo Group:

> Kodak says Kodachrome may come back
> Posted by: "Jack Honeycutt" 
> Wed Mar 21, 2012 3:27 pm (PDT)
> 
> 
> Cross post from 3D users group (from today):
> 
>> I just attended (last night) a SMPTE meeting of the Hollywood Chapter.
>> The subject was "The Technology and History of Film, presented by Beverly
>> Pasterczyk of Eastman Kodak Co." Ms. Pasterczyk is a chemist with film R
>> & D at Kodak, and she mentioned that Kodak Research is currently engaged in
>> the continuing design and implementation of new emulsions, such as the new
>> version of the Vision III product.
>> 
>> Regarding consumer films, she said that they are considering restructuring
>> a new approach aimed at producing these at a reasonable cost in much
>> smaller volumes than in the past. She said that new technology will
>> permit them to continue to produce these in "boutique quantities" using
>> single coating machines rather than the huge multiple coaters of the
>> past. She said that basically, as long as they had sufficient orders for
>> a minimum of a single master roll "54 inches (almost 1-1/2 meters) wide by
>> whatever length - no minimum stated", they would consider examining
>> production in terms of the economics involved. Future production would
>> primarily be on an "on demand" basis.
>> 
>> This would include the infrastructure for processing, probably at a single
>> lab, either in Rochester NY, or sub-contracted.
>> 
>> "On demand" could conceivably include any film that Kodak has ever
>> manufactured. Someone in the audience asked the inevitable question:
>> "Including Kodachrome?" Her answer: "Yes, including Kodachrome". She
>> added that while small runs of Kodachrome were unlikely, it was not out of
>> the question, since they have had numerous inquiries.
>> 
>> To the question "How could this be made possible?" her answer was
>> intriguing. "Volume is the answer. Consumer groups of large numbers of
>> individuals could petition for the return of a specific film. This would
>> include not only large companies, but also individuals banded together such
>> as camera clubs, especially those with a large enough base such that they
>> could collectively join on a national or even international basis".
>> 
> Lots to think about.
> 


> Re: Kodak says Kodachrome may come back
> Posted by: "Charles MacDonald" 
> Wed Mar 21, 2012 4:55 pm (PDT)
> 
> 
> On 12-03-21 06:27 PM, Jack Honeycutt wrote:
> 
> > Cross post from 3D users group (from today):
> >
> 
> > Ms. Pasterczyk is a chemist with film R
> > & D at Kodak, and she mentioned that Kodak Research is currently engaged in
> > the continuing design and implementation of new emulsions, such as the new
> > version of the Vision III product.
> >
> > Regarding consumer films, she said that they are considering restructuring
> > a new approach aimed at producing these at a reasonable cost in much
> > smaller volumes than in the past. She said that new technology will
> > permit them to continue to produce these in "boutique quantities" using
> > single coating machines rather than the huge multiple coaters of the
> > past. She said that basically, as long as they had sufficient orders for
> > a minimum of a single master roll "54 inches (almost 1-1/2 meters) wide by
> > whatever length - no minimum stated", they would consider examining
> > production in terms of the economics involved. Future production would
> > primarily be on an "on demand" basis.
> 
> WOW you could read that several ways now could you not.
> 
> When Kodak saw that demand for film would drop they responded by trying 
> to be very efficient, they built a HUGE new Highly automated coating 
> machine at "Building 38" in Kodak Park. This project also updated 
> another machine in an adjacent building. and they transferred all their 
> film production worldwide to that one complex. This is the reason that 
> for example tri-x still film is now called 400TX and has different 
> developing times.
> 
> All the other plants were shut down. Toronto (3500 Egglington)is now a 
> housing development for example.
> 
> The building 38 machine needs 5000 feet of leader to thread it, and 
> another 5000 of run out after a coating job. Plus whatever stock is 
> being coated. It can coat 5000 ft of film is a few minutes. And what 
> What has been mentioned in the APUG.org discussions, it now only run a 
> day or two a week. The second machine is idle, or perhaps dismantled.
> 
> At the time they were built, both machines ran 7/24
> 
> > "Yes, including Kodachrome". She
> > added that while small runs of Kodachrome were unlikely, it was not out of
> > the question, since they have had numerous inquiries.
> >
> > To the question "How could this be made possible?" her answer was
> > intriguing. "Volume is the answer. Consumer groups of large numbers of
> > individuals could petition for the return of a specific film.
> 
> The 54 inch wide web that Kodak uses makes 38 strips of 35MM or about 
> twice that of 16mm. With the building 38 machine is is probably not 
> POSSIBLE to make a batch of less than 5000 ft. (190,000 ft of 35 
> mmmequivelent)
> 
> That would make 34,500 rolls of 35mm 36 exposure film or 4250 100 ft 
> rolls of 16mm movie film. It is not practical to slit both 35 and 16 
> form the same master roll. Also their are often coating defects that 
> have to be discarded at the finishing stage. The film is checked by 
> Infra-red light based machines, and a computer defect map is drawn up to 
> guide the finishing department.
> 
> I understand that some of the machines that were scrapped ran at a lower 
> feet to minute rating and so could have made smaller runs. AT one time 
> Toronto made many products for the Canadian market of at the time 20 
> million people. Before it was scrapped it made all of Kodak's microfilm 
> worldwide for a time, and at another time was used to make all the world 
> supply of Eastman colour negative for about a year) So it could have 
> made almost every product in relatively small batches. BUT they figured 
> that one monster machine was they way to keep costs down.
> 
> The largest volume product for the last few years is of course has been 
> Eastman Colour Print 2383/3383. BUT US theatres are expected to almost 
> completely switch to digital projection this year, which will dry up 
> that market. (One 120 Minute film print for one theatre uses 10,000 ft 
> of 35mm ECP. Which is discarded within 6 months when the movie goes out 
> of theatres)
> 
> One can hope that some way can be found for Kodak to wiggle out of the 
> dependence on Building 38.
> 
> There is a book out by a retired Kodak employee Robert Shanebrooke (he 
> self Published) but with the cooperation of Kodak - called "Making Kodak 
> Film" which shows a lot of the process. it can be ordered from the 
> author at http://www.makingkodakfilm.com/
> 
> -- 
> Charles MacDonald Stittsville Ontario
> 
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