''writing a text on filmic operations which are able to produce knowledge
about space (itself, without the support of a narration) I ask myself what
examples this comunity will come up with both for examples of reliable and
unreliable perceptual information produced through (uncut) camera
movement.''

Vorkapich wrote a lot about how framing and composition dealt with that
perception.

This music video illustrates some of those concepts....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY5zaDZq0sc

2015-08-17 5:04 GMT-04:00 fred truniger <fred.truni...@gmail.com>:

> "In fact, it appears that if he uses all the visual information that is
> available, there is no way at all of fooling a moving observer once we let
> him determine his own movements." (Julian Hochberg, In: Perception
> (Englewood Cliffs, 1964). 94.)
>
> dear frameworkers
> writing a text on filmic operations which are able to produce knowledge
> about space (itself, without the support of a narration) I ask myself what
> examples this comunity will come up with both for examples of reliable and
> unreliable perceptual information produced through (uncut) camera movement.
> classical: pans show the context of an initial shot and thus help to
> pigeonhole the space shown. there are thousands of examples in which the
> parallax produced by lateral movement helps the viewer to read the
> structure and depth of a space. by contrast, the very slow and very short
> lateral movement in Johan Lurf's films reconnaissance (AUT 2012) and
> embargo (AUT 2014) as well as in volko kamensky's film oral history (GER
> 2009) produce alienation much more than clarification. my guess is, the
> reason for this to be the speed of the movement: too high, to slow will
> produce an uneasiness which counteracts the legibility of the movement. but
> in lurf's case the use of long focal lenght contributes to the effect.
> lateral movment and long focal length together make an interesting
> combination. it seems to withhold from the viewer some of the information
> needed "to determine his own movements". the same is true for the
> combimation of frontal camera movement and zooming at the same time - but
> zooming, of course, is not a very usual physical perception of my body.
>
> any suggestions for similar or objecting examples? the simpler the
> (combination of) movements, the better.
> thank you all!
> fred
>
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