If anyone really wants to geek out on slit-scan madness, of course the apex of the art came quite early with Doug Trumbull's stargate corridor sequence for 2001. This was an extremely baroque studio setup with multiple moving planes of room-sized artwork, front and back lighting, motion control, and, of course, slit scan photography.

In 2002, someone extracted the original production artwork by unwrapping the edited film footage:


http://seriss.com/people/erco/2001/

Nowadays live-action style slit scan is super easy to accomplish with After Effects and other 2D applications. And of course, many of the slit-scan classics (such as the Dr. Who main title) are much more easily accomplished with 3D software.

Aaron


At 10/31/2016, you wrote:
John Whitney developed motion picture slit-scan photography, and though he didn't really use it in his own films, he did in his commercial work. But it pretty quickly became a standard tool for effects houses, showing up in commercials, logos, special effects movies, etc., so there are probably lots of examples out there from a lot of effects people. Robert Abel & Associates specialized in it.

Like here's one example from Abel:
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsYFjITWXSo>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsYFjITWXSo


Mark Toscano

On Mon, Oct 31, 2016 at 10:07 AM, George, Sherman <<mailto:sgeo...@ucsd.edu>sgeo...@ucsd.edu> wrote: Every time the Enterprise goes into warp drive and the narrative scroll in 2001.
Here is a link that is a pretty good explanation:
<https://vimeo.com/71702374>https://vimeo.com/71702374
Hard work on film but there must be an easier way digitally.
Sherman

> On Oct 31, 2016, at 6:22 AM, Kasper Lauritzen <<mailto:byldorf.fi...@gmail.com>byldorf.fi...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Dear Frameworkers,
>
> I remember reading about slit scan photography being used to make title sequences where the static title is turned into a rolling wave, by moving the printed title up and down. I thought it was John Whitney who did it (I could be wrong), but now I can't find it again, and I forgot the original source. > So does anyone have a clue which film, TV series or advertisement that used this technique specifically to make the "wavy title"?
>
> Thank you very much
> Kasper
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Sherman George
<mailto:sgeo...@ucsd.edu>sgeo...@ucsd.edu
<tel:858-229-4368>858-229-4368



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      Aaron F. Ross, artist and educator
      http://dr-yo.com
      http://digitalartsguild.com

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