On Tue, Jan 07, 2003 at 12:33:07PM -0300, Fernando Gleiser wrote:
> On Tue, 7 Jan 2003, Kevin A. Pieckiel wrote:
> 
> > This is my netstat -m output:
> > 142/352/6016 mbufs in use (current/peak/max):
> >         131 mbufs allocated to data
> >         11 mbufs allocated to packet headers
> > 81/160/1504 mbuf clusters in use (current/peak/max)
> > 408 Kbytes allocated to network (9% of mb_map in use)
> > 0 requests for memory denied
> > 0 requests for memory delayed
> > 0 calls to protocol drain routines
> >
> > I try to ping a network connection and get this:
> > ping: sendto: No buffer space available
> > ping: sendto: No buffer space available
> > ping: sendto: No buffer space available
> > ping: sendto: No buffer space available
> >
> > I see NOTHING wrong with my buffer space.  The newsgroups all say that
> > increasing mbufs or nmbclusters or whatever will fix this error.  It does
> > not.  What am I missing?  Right now, I do not specify values for nmbclusters
> > or related settings in my kernel config.
> 
> What does 'limits -b' say?

# limits -b
Resource limits (current):
  sbsize           infinity bytes


Kevin

---
This message was signed by GnuPG.  E-Mail [EMAIL PROTECTED]
to receive my public key.  You may also get my key from pgpkeys.mit.edu;
my ID is 0xF1604E92 and will expire on 01 January 2004.

Attachment: msg14631/pgp00000.pgp
Description: PGP signature

Reply via email to