On Sun, 2008-03-23 at 17:01 -0700, Patrick C wrote:
> MyISAM supports locking (like all engines) but not transactions. Without
> transactions, you can do a lock lock a table or tables, and unlock them,
> however you cannot roll back statements -- so if a statement down the line
> fails for some reason there is no way to rollback and undo past statements
> (automagically at least)
> 
> The simple solution is to use InnoDB, which supports Good Things you want -
> it's more scalable across multiple threads, row-level locking, transactions,
> foreign keys, etc.
> 
> The differences are fairly well documented. It sounds like you're using PDO,
> please read up on auto-commit mode. Don't reinvent the wheel, especially
> when the wheel is already built better than you could hack out a replacement
> for it :)
> 
> -Patrick
> 
> On 23/03/2008, Da Rock <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> >
> >
> > On Sun, 2008-03-23 at 19:17 -0400, Bill Moran wrote:
> > > Da Rock <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > I know this is not quite the list for these things, but I tried the
> > PHP
> > > > list and got no reply whatsoever. In fact, I don't think anyone's home
> > > > cause the entire list is silent...
> > > >
> > > > I'm trying to setup a system using web apps in PHP using MySQL as the
> > > > backend database, only this time I need transaction services.
> > According
> > > > to the PHP manual if a transaction is served for MySQL it can come
> > back
> > > > as committed even though it may not. So what I'm trying to accomplish
> > is
> > > > develop some row level locking with the PHP script.
> > > >
> > > > I enquired about setting up a servlet (for want of a better term) with
> > > > PHP, something that will serve the requests of the rest of the app. To
> > > > be honest though, I'm not entirely sure how to approach this.
> > >
> > > Wow.  That's one crazy attempt at a workaround.
> > >
> > > The correct solution is to use the correct tool for the job.  Either
> > > install PostgreSQL and use it instead, or use InnoDB tables.
> > >
> >
> >
> > Actually, I think I may have got some facts confused here- I thought
> > that MyISAM was not supposed to be transaction supported, but according
> > to most stuff I've read it supports table level transaction locking.
> >
> > And the PHP manual says it will only come back with a false commit IF
> > the table DOESN'T support transactions at all.
> >
> > So what is the truth here? If MyISAM supports transaction table locking
> > I may be ok here- and save myself a hell of a lot of trouble to boot.
> >
> > Thanks guys, again.
> >

I remember now exactly why I wanted MyISAM- you see the table locking is
exactly what I need for the task. I just need to come up with a method
to ensure what I send to the server does actually get written- or am I
just being paranoid?

The task I require needs to offer direct sequential access with no
undoing of written data. And given the legality of the task based on
these strict requirements, you can understand my paranoia.

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