George Davidovich wrote:
> On Tue, Sep 01, 2009 at 06:03:19PM +0000, Paul Schmehl wrote:
>> I found a sed tutorial once that did this, but I can't seem to find it
>> again.  
> 
> You're probably thinking of "Useful One-Line Scripts for Sed":
> 
> http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line.txt
> 
> A good follow-up:
> 
> http://www.osnews.com/story/21004/Awk_and_Sed_One-Liners_Explained
> 
>> I have a file with multiple lines, each of which contains a single ip
>> followed by a /32 and a comma.  I want to combine all those lines into
>> a single line by removing all the newline characters at the end of
>> each line.
>>
>> What's the best/most efficient way of doing that in a shell?
> 
> A sed solution would be
> 
>   sed -e :a -e '$!N; s/\n/ /; ta' my_file
> 
> Other (easier to remember) solutions could include:
> 
>   tr -d '\n' < my_file
>   tr '\n' ' ' < my_file 
> 
>   echo $(cat my_file)  # not so useless use of cat!
>  
>   paste -s my_file
> 
>   while read line; do 
>     joined="$joined $(echo $line)"
>   done < my_file
>   echo $joined
> 
> Lots of options, of course.  Even more with Perl. 

Yeah, how 'bout Perl:

% perl -ne 's/\n/ /g; print;' < tests/ips.txt

:)

Steve


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