On Tue, Sep 22, 2009 at 03:29:43PM -0400, Carmel NY wrote:
> On Tue, 22 Sep 2009 14:08:21 -0500
> David Kelly <dke...@hiwaay.net> wrote:
> 
> [snip]
> 
> > It would, but he's approaching the problem with Windows-colored
> > glasses.
> 
> I am not sure what that is even suppose to mean, so I'll just ignore it.

It means you are trying to make Unix conform to your Windows habits. For
security, simplicity, and security (yes, "security" twice) we are not in
the habit of wantonly sharing our file systems. Historically remote
login has been difficult on Windows systems while file(system) sharing
has been relatively easy so Windows Administrators learned how to manage
systems by pushing files around on shared file systems. I'm saying it
sounds an awful lot like that is what you are trying to do. If so then
you will quickly find Unix doesn't like to let root (Administrator)
easily cross system boundaries.

Meanwhile others have listed a multitude of utilities for shooting files
across multiple machines, including simple terminal login and more
advanced GUI X11 login. None of which use shared file systems as their
core connection method.

Expanding on what I said earlier, if "joe" is userid 1001, do not reuse
1001 on any other machine unless "joe" has an account there too. Unix
file ownership is by userid and groupid *numbers*. The number doesn't
have to be defined in the password or group databases to be used. Most
file sync and archivers only use the numbers.

-- 
David Kelly N4HHE, dke...@hiwaay.net
========================================================================
Whom computers would destroy, they must first drive mad.
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