On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 20:06:08 -0400, PJ <af.gour...@videotron.ca> wrote:
> Anyway, I found the solution on the web... couldn't belive it was that
> simple: just ignore the crap spewed out on the screen and just mount iit
> as you would any other disk.
> # mount  -t msdosfs /dev/da0s1 /mnt
> and that's it

Additionally, when you use mount_msdosfs, you can specify
masks (-m and -M) in order not to have +x attributes on all
the files; the MS-DOS file system on the stick could give
you unwanted results, for example if you have a .jpg file
on the stick and want to open it (with the default app for
.jpg file type), the system will try to execute it.



> Now to see how I can use it to restore stuff. :-D

If you want to use the stick for FreeBSD operations, why not
give it a real file system (i. e. UFS) instead of some old
FAT? You can simply

        # newfs /dev/da0

and then access it in the standard way:

        # mount /dev/da0 /mnt

See that file owner:group, permissions and flags are now
supported, and files that are not supposed to be executables
don't have +x attribute (as in opposite to FAT / msdosfs).

You could even add an entry in /etc/fstab like this:

        /dev/da0s1 /media/stick msdosfs rw,noauto,noatime 0 0

or, for proper UFS:

        /dev/da0 /media/stick ufs rw,noauto,noatime 0 0

Keep in mind that when using device names, it's a matter of
in which sequence device are detected that result in the
corresponding device name (da0, da1 etc.); using labels is
the more elegant way here.



-- 
Polytropon
Magdeburg, Germany
Happy FreeBSD user since 4.0
Andra moi ennepe, Mousa, ...
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