On 2012-01-19 18:18, Michael MacLeod wrote:
On Thu, Jan 19, 2012 at 9:06 PM, Matt Connor <b...@xerq.net [5]> wrote:


On 2012-01-19 15 [3]:19, Xin Li wrote:

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 01/19/12 13:22, Matt Connor wrote:

On 19.01.2012 13:15, Nick Sayer wrote:

I have a VPS at rootbsd.net [1], and have been running
8.2-RELEASE
with a XENHVM kernel with a patch to fix the do something
smart
panic in if_xn. I fetched the 9.0-RELEASE source tree and
built a
kernel to try and it worked without any muss or fuss. I did
the
rest of the upgrade and its working just fine, so far as I
can
tell.

And there was much
rejoicing._______________________________________________

Same here at ssdnodes.com [2] - we pulled the new source tree,
rebuilt
with our modified XENHVM and havent had any issues so far.

We had many tweaks in /etc/sysctl.conf to improve throughput
for
the 8.2-RELEASE, the 9.0-RELEASE systems still remained snappy
after the tweaks were removed.

What kinds of tweaks are needed?  (i.e. should we make them the
defaults?)

The tweaks were only "needed" because we were trying to achieve a
specific network throughput in our particular workload (read:
turning the knob all the way until it broke off). These values are
no longer in production on version 9.0-RELEASE, I highly recommend
these never become default.

For your amusement, Ive included the values below:

<<<...SNIP...>>>

Any of these recommended for those of us who arent rushing to leave
8.2 yet?

Links:
------
[1] http://rootbsd.net
[2] http://ssdnodes.com


It honestly depends on what you're trying to accomplish, I can't give any blanket advice that will cover all the various workloads. Ours in particular was serving a combination of many small image files and a few large files that were being constantly hit between 150-300Mbps. After a month or two of benchmarking, we found these values to help considerably.

If your workload is similar (or you're feeling particularly sadistic today), I would suggest doing rigorous benchmarks on your current system, then changing the sysctl values one-by-one and making note of the changes in performance. Unfortunately you cannot do the same with the /boot/loader.conf values (these actually require a reboot).
_______________________________________________
freebsd-xen@freebsd.org mailing list
http://lists.freebsd.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-xen
To unsubscribe, send any mail to "freebsd-xen-unsubscr...@freebsd.org"

Reply via email to