Hi,

On Fri, Feb 6, 2015 at 8:18 PM, dmccunney <dennis.mccun...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I allocated the 2GB slice for FreeDOS expecting to use FAT16, and
> FAT32 support was a happy fringe benefit.  Even with a full FreeDOS
> installation including pretty much everything on the ISO, and an
> assortment of other old DOS apps, I think I've used about a quarter of
> the 2GB FreeDOS partition.  I'm trying to think of what I might store
> there using DOS that would *need* more space, and can't think of
> anything.  The advantage to FAT32 was more efficient use of existing
> space, because a cluster could be a lot smaller.

My Lenovo's FAT32 partition (4 GB) is almost full, mostly due to lots
of DJGPP .ZIPs (backups). Granted, there's a lot of overlap there, and
of course with networking (and free/libre tools) you can offload
anything until the need is more pressing.

I'm still trying to improve my (FreeDOS-based) MetaDOS floppy .img. So
it's like me bragging that I don't need more than 400 kb! I've just
offloaded everything to the network, where you can download it
separately (to RAM disk or optional hard disk image), if truly
desired. It doesn't mean there isn't more stuff (obviously), but it
isn't 100% obvious what is literally 100% needed or not (for all
audiences). There's just too many use cases, and I'm not fully
comfortable even now because I know how much is out there (literally
decades of software).

Niklaus Wirth ported his Oberon compiler and OS to a small 1 MB RAM,
FPGA ("RISC") machine. Can you live with such a small amount?
Partially, yes. Do most people want to do that? No. Can things be
slimmed down? Definitely. Can we support every obscure legacy
(hardware and software) in such minimal amounts? Not really.

You have to pick your poison: games, multimedia, text, programming,
networking, math, utilities, system/low-level/drivers, emulation, etc.

P.S. Check your %windir%\fonts subdir, and tell me how big it is!   ;-)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dive into the World of Parallel Programming. The Go Parallel Website,
sponsored by Intel and developed in partnership with Slashdot Media, is your
hub for all things parallel software development, from weekly thought
leadership blogs to news, videos, case studies, tutorials and more. Take a
look and join the conversation now. http://goparallel.sourceforge.net/
_______________________________________________
Freedos-user mailing list
Freedos-user@lists.sourceforge.net
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/freedos-user

Reply via email to