Yes, I DO suppose this would be one (extreme) form of Hyperloop <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperloop> which just made me realize that my invocation of the inertial reference frame requiring these "straight tubes" to be spirals is equivalent to Coriolis... and in fact could probably be characterized as "geodesics" in a specific space-time geometry implied by the spin of the earth?

I"m generally a neo-Luddite but that doesn't mean I'm not fascinated by these feats of engineering based in esoteric if not highly advanced science (simple orbital mechanics, mag-lev, evacuated tubes, etc.)


It is entertaining (if not perhaps instructive) to refer back to some of Jules (and his son Michel) Verne's prognostications on the topic of large scale pneumatic transport.

  An Express of the Future ,  etc

It also suggests that Shipping Containers of the future may be cylindrical rather than rectangular boxes? Or perhaps for backward compatibility there will be a business in making cylindrical shells that fit a container "just right" and a discount on items which can pack around them in the chord area surrounding?

On 8/6/17 6:30 PM, Marcus Daniels wrote:
Shouldn't it be used for Hyperloop?

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 6, 2017, at 6:05 PM, Steven A Smith <sasm...@swcp.com <mailto:sasm...@swcp.com>> wrote:

So... *IF* you could bore a perfectly straight hole thorugh the earth to your precise antipodal location (probably having to put one hell of a "well casing" in, probably of neutronium to withstand the temperatures and turbulences of the core?) what would the "orbit" of a falling body be? Would a massive object (e.g. metal sphere) simply fall to the center and then by it's momentum "rise" until it reached it's apogee somewhat short of the antipodal end of the casing, slowed somewhat by the atmosphere?

Is this a good problem for a second year differential calculus student? Or might there be some simplifying assumptions that could be made?


My rough attempt to estimate the behaviour/trajectory: (spoiler?)

The "boundary conditions" suggest that upon dropping the mass, gravity and air density would be very close to what we have at or just above the surface and the mass would achieve terminal velocity (122mph for a sky-belly-flopper, a bit more for a true sky-diver, and probably somewhat higher for an iron or steel sphere, for instance) long before air density nor the value of gravity changed appreciably.

Near the core, the air density would approach zero (my assumption of a spherical earth and that the gravitational attraction of the mass "outside" the radius of the current location of the sphere summing to zero) it seems likely that terminal velocity would rise to some point, but it seems very difficult to estimate.

Other assumptions include that the diameter of the sphere is small enough compared to the borehole that there would be no significant amount of compression of the column of air in front of the sphere, if it were a "tight fit" I suspect the ball would compress the column of air under it until that pressure's exerted force exceeded that of gravitational pull and would eventually "bounce" long before it got near the core.

I also thought of coriolis forces, but then realized that the trajectory has only an R, no theta nor phi component, so in principle the sphere would not experience any coriolis force. (nod to Nick's Swirlies) On the other hand, since the sphere would nominally be in freefall, it's trajectory would be influenced by it's initial velocity (relative to the rotation of the earth), suggesting it would follow a spiral path toward the center of the earth, suggesting that if we wanted a "bullet-train" that went straight through the earth, we would need to give it a *spiral* core? Evacuating such a a tube would allow true orbital speeds. The precision required to "drop" a bullet-train car "through* the earth seems excruciatingly difficult (as would be coming up with methods for the coring and the lining) seems insurmountable... but some form of magnetic levitation type "correction" along the way would seem possible if not easy.

I think tidal forces can safely be ignored?

I fondly remember when I first heard about the Freeman Dyson's "Dyson Sphere" and then Niven's _Ringworld_ and his followon _Integral Trees_ and Bob Forward's _Rocheworld_, realizing that there were alternative physics/engineering regimes not that far from our current experience, yet quite counter-intuitive to us.

'nuff for now,

 - Steve


On 8/6/17 5:30 PM, Gary Schiltz wrote:
That's really cool, Gillian. If you click on Santa Fe, you get a nice snarky response like one of the following for the Antipodes Location:

You`re alone and the water is so cold.
Incredible! There is no one around you, just fish.
You`re in the water and all you need is a boat.
Most likely the ocean. Watch out for sharks.

So, if you decide to tunnel straight through the center of the earth, you might want to try making a little course correction somewhere.

Fortunately for me, most of Ecuador's antipodes location is on the island of Sumatra, which happens to grow my favorite variety of coffee.

On Sun, Aug 6, 2017 at 11:28 AM, Gillian Densmore <gil.densm...@gmail.com <mailto:gil.densm...@gmail.com>> wrote:

    https://www.antipodesmap.com/#about-antipodes
    <https://www.antipodesmap.com/#about-antipodes>

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