Marcus,
Good points, all. I suggest you turn to the Copenhagen interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (the "usual interpretation") for musings on your very pertinent question about "Why probabilities in the physical world".
Although, I'm sure you have already looked there.
Of course, the Copenhagen guys (Heisenberg, Born, etc.) don't really try to answer your question either - opting instead to say that theirs is merely a theory, a model. And, of course, they are right. On the other hand, other physicists (i.e. de Broglie, Bohm, Einstein and others) have spent a century trying to defend causal determinism against the Copenhagen interpretation. These days the defenders of the faith have resorted to philosophy over this issue and are considering the "ontic" versus the "epistemic". And yet, Copenhagen is still referred to as "the usual interpretation", and when QM is taught today, I think, it is essentially Copenhagen or some derivative of it. Perhaps Bell's theorem has contributed to the longevity of the Copenhagen perspective.



On 8/8/17 2:42 AM, Marcus Daniels wrote:

Grant writes:


"Fortunately, the AI folks don't seem to see - yet - that they are stumbling all over the missing piece: stochastic adaptation. You know, like in evolution: chance mutations. AI is still down with a bad case of causal determinism. But I expect they will fairly shortly get over that. Watch out."


What is probability, physically? It could be an illusion and that there is no such thing as an independent observer. Even if that is true, sampling techniques are used in many machine learning algorithms -- it is not a question of if they work, it is an academic question of why they work.


Marcus

------------------------------------------------------------------------
*From:* Friam <friam-boun...@redfish.com> on behalf of Grant Holland <grant.holland...@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Monday, August 7, 2017 11:38:03 PM
*To:* The Friday Morning Applied Complexity Coffee Group; Carl Tollander
*Subject:* Re: [FRIAM] Future of humans and artificial intelligence

That sounds right, Carl. Asimov's three "laws" of robotics are more like Asimov's three "wishes" for robotics. AI entities are already no longer servants. They have become machine learners. They have actually learned to project conditional probability. The cat is out of the barn. Or is it that the horse is out of the bag?

Whatever. Fortunately, the AI folks don't seem to see - yet - that they are stumbling all over the missing piece: stochastic adaptation. You know, like in evolution: chance mutations. AI is still down with a bad case of causal determinism. But I expect they will fairly shortly get over that. Watch out.

And we still must answer Stephen Hawking's burning question: Is intelligence a survivable trait?


On 8/7/17 9:54 PM, Carl Tollander wrote:
It seems to me that there are many here in the US who are not entirely on board with Asimov's First Law of Robotics, at least insofar as it may apply to themselves, so I suspect notions of "reining it in" are probably not going to fly.




On Mon, Aug 7, 2017 at 1:57 AM, Alfredo Covaleda Vélez <alfr...@covaleda.co <mailto:alfr...@covaleda.co>> wrote:

    Future will be quite interesting. How will be the human being of
    the future? For sure not a human being in the way we know.

    
http://m.eltiempo.com/tecnosfera/novedades-tecnologia/peligros-y-avances-de-la-inteligencia-artificial-para-los-humanos-117158
    
<http://m.eltiempo.com/tecnosfera/novedades-tecnologia/peligros-y-avances-de-la-inteligencia-artificial-para-los-humanos-117158>

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