Title: Re: [gaidhlig-gu-leor] Mime-Version: 1.0
Aonghais 's a h-uile duine,

Tapadh leat airson do fhreagairte, Aonghais, tha sin feumail du dearbh.

Ciamar a tha thu na la\ithean seo?  Tha mi-fhi/n ro thrang, tha mi a' smaoineachadh.  

Chan 'eil ti\de gu leo\r agam a bhith a' de\anamh rudan a tha mi airson.
(There isn't enough time to do things that I want (to do))...Not sure that sentence works at all...;D

Uill, feumaidh mi falbh.  Chan 'eil mi aig m'obair an-diugh, ach tha obair-taighe agam a dheanamh.
Well, I must go.  I am not at work today, but I have my housework to do.
(Chan 'eil mi cinnteach am bheil an rosg-rann seo ceart cuideachd.)

Mar sin leibh.
Siu\saidh

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From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] (Angus MacLeod)
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: [gaidhlig-gu-leor] Mime-Version: 1.0
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 12:38:26 -0400


 

ednsue wrote:
>Tha taigh againn rapach.
>Our house is messy.

Do you - or anyone else online - know the difference between "rapach" and
"salach"...and which word is used in what situation?  And are there any
other words for "dirty" that are common?
A Shiu\saidh,

For what it's worth:
"Salach", in my experience, deals primarily with physical dirt, although it could be used as "foul" e.g. foul-mouthed. "Rapach" has a wider range of meanings and can describe the weather for example. I haven't heard "salach" refer to weather.

"Tha Iain salach." would tell me that John is physically dirty, but says nothing of his character.
"Tha Iain rapach." would imply to me that you were talking about more than just physical dirt, or that being physically dirty was a habit for him, or that he was in a dishevelled state that might or might not be physically dirty.

As Eilidh used it, I would take from it that her house was in a disordered state rather than being dirty the way my car mats are now from people tracking mud onto them during three weeks of rain!

I've heard "druineach" ( my spelling of a word I've heard spoken -- I can't find anything close in Dwelly.... druin rhymes with druim.......) used for "mess", but I've never heard an adjective form (messy).

Hope this helps,
Le meas,
Aonghas
 
 

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