Wii Sports is by far the most accessible game I have found, although Wii Fit is good too. To access Wii sports, or any other game cd you have in, start the Wii with the power button, then point at the screen until you feel the Wiimote vibrate, then push A. You'll want to learn the sounds of the channels so that when you put in a brand new game, you'll be able to tell it from the others. The sports game sounds a bit like a fanfare. To change between channels, press the plus and minus keys, which are on opposite sides of the indented button, which gives you the option of going back to the Wii main menu screen. Then you have to find the start button, which is just going to be trial and error. I can tell you though that it's lower and to the right of the sports channel button. If you click on the wrong thing, usually a channel change button or a go back button, just start the process over--soon you'll be pointing and clicking easily enough. Anyway, after you click a, you'll hear the fanfare in a slightly lower key with some electric guitars in the background. Press a and b together. then comes the main sports menu, with tennis, bowling, baseball, golf, and boxing from top to bottom. All these games are mostly accessible, though tennis gets tricky if you have a lot of points and are playing the computer--you'll hit the ball out of bounds as often as not. I can beat my brother-in-law often when we play together, but the computer isn't an easy opponent once you're a pro. Anyway, with most of the games, you click the one you want--using the arrows on the DPad to move between items, then, you'll find five buttons. Upper left: 1 player. Upper right: two players. Bottom row goes three players, four players, and more Wiimotes. This is not true of Baseball which is only a two-player game. After you click the game, you'll notice you can only move to the left, and that only once. The default is same players, but moving to the left highlights change players. After you pick your players or leave them you're ready to play. In Tennis it's good to listen to others play a game or two to give you an idea of the timing involved, but of course you can try yourself and see what works. The standard tennis game I play has me in front and back facing either a computer or a human opponent in front and back, but you can play teams as well as have the computer be in one of the positions for you. To get to the game where you are both front and back person, which means that you hit the ball with either person as it comes over the net, go down once. Then you'll be in the match menu where you choose the number of games to play. Default is singles, but if you move left once you'll be in best of five. Move right from singles to get to best of three. Then hit a and start. To serve, either throw the ball up by swinging the Wiimote or simply hit a, then swing to hit the ball. If you're in single mode the sounds from the other side of the net will be quieter, but pay close attention to the volume of the ball-how it' is hit and how it bounces. You'll be able to judge fairly accurately when to hit if you listen to them. Your front person hits the ball before it bounces; your rear person hits it after. Generally, you hit the ball a half second after it bounces if you're using the rear person, and about two thirds of a second after it is hit to use the front player. Bowling is very straightforward--just hold down b, swing your arm back, swing it forward until your arm is raised and, at the fastest part of the swing, let go of b. There is also a bowling training game that's accessible--the power throws. For every frame, additional pins are added so that in the tenth frame, you're knocking down 91 pins if you get a strike. My high score for that one is 665 points--I still don't know how I did it, but I bowled a nearly perfect game that time. For baseball, and perhaps tennis as well, you'll need to crank the sound a bit to hear the pitches coming at you. There are two distinct sounds,, and you want to swing about a quarter second after the start of the second, longer sound. Pitching is easy--just swing like you're pitching and, if you want, you can use a, b, or both to modify the pitches. For best results, hold a and b and gently shake it--you'll throw a slow splitter that's almost impossible to hit. Likewise, golf is relatively straightforward, though not as accessible as you have to rely on someone who can read the screen to tell you about distance, wind speed and direction, and so on--but even without all that help I often get birdies on beginner level. Once you start, you'll have a skill level menu where you can move up and down, and it defaults to beginner. Generally, the first hole on beginner takes a good drive and a few putts to get you in the hole. The second needs a good hard swing, a moderately hard swing, and some putts to get you there. The third hole is much like the first, but a little bit shorter. Learn the sounds the ball makes when it bounces--sand, fairway and green all sound different. Boxing might seem straightforward and too easy at first--a few punches the first few games is all it takes to knock out your opponent, but as you play the opponents get tougher. You'll need the nunchuck to play by the way. Punch right and left with them, and when you think a punch might be coming at you, lean the remote and nunchuck to one side or the other as if you're leaning your body. In the training section, there are some boxing games to teach you to punch, lean and block. I would also highly recommend Wii Fit, as there are a lot of very cool games. My favorites are the tightrope, where you not only walk the wire but must jump over chompers as well--and they make sound so you can judge when to jump. Ski jump is good too but I don't get far. Hoola hoop is probably the most accessible game on there because you not only hear the hoops falling, but where--and you can lean to catch them. The boxing practice, the yoga, and the strength training are also nice. Soccer may prove to be accessible as well, but the table tilt and penguin games are not. So then, I give Wii Sports 3.5 start, and Wii Fit about the same. Other games, like Party games and Party Games 2 are playable--but you'll need someone to set it up unless you just want to play random games at random levels, because the DPad doesn't move you through the menus, and neither does the stick on the Nunchuck. Stay away from Neighborhood games--it's almost completely inaccessible.
Those are the ones I've tried.  HTH


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----- Original Message ----- From: "Ann" <tate...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2009 7:51 PM
Subject: [Audyssey] WII tips


Hi folks,

My nephew just got a brand new Wii game system. I've seen this talked about before on this list, but didn't pay much attention since I didn't have one, and couldn't afford one soon.

Anyhow, what games are the easiest for blind people to play on the Wii? I think some sports games, like a baseball, boxing, tennis, golf, bowling etc., games came with the system. Any and all other tips you can give me will be helpful.

Thanks.

~Ann

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