on the subject of games.
through www.synthstudio.net
I got a site www.queststudios.com
this has a database of the sierra
soundtracks.
also actual tracks from the cds remixed.
some midi to for various yamaha and roland synths.
I spent the last week getting all I could access from the misc and other 
sections, I think I have just about the entire site, 2.3gb of stuff.
At 11:28 a.m. 11/09/2009, you wrote:
>Hi Nicol,
>Great question and it brings up alot of nostalgia.
>Usually the cabinet games were a single stand up model. It had a moniter 
>inside the  cabinet, and usually a piece of glass seperated the screen from 
>the outside but not all of them were like that.
>On a flat surface sticking out from the cabinet in front of the moniter were 
>the controls. These had a start button, and usually a joystick and some 
>buttons. Depending on the game there can be as many as six or more buttons.
>Other controller types were the steering wheel, pistols or machine guns, track 
>ball, fighter jet joysticks, and a control type called a "paddle" which is  
>just a spinner type of controller that was used mostly for games like pong and 
>arknoid. There were also the bigger cabinets that  were shaped like tables (I 
>have only seen this type of cabinet for pac man), and the kind you can sit in 
>and drive with gas and brake pedels, and even a pedel for changing gears. 
>There was also a game where you literally sat on something like a mortorcycle. 
>It had the gas and brakes in the handles, and could also rock to the sides to 
>lean into the curves. Lastly there was the periscope types which were  popular 
>for a brief time for a submarine game and a tank game.
>Pac man only had the one joystick and a few start buttons. Most of the arcade 
>games had extra controls for up to four people to play at   one time, while 
>others allowed you to switch off between players.
>When I could see, there were arcades on every mall and corner, and it seemed 
>like every store on mainstreet had at least one near it's entrance. They 
>usually cost a quarter ( an american dollar is 100 cents, so a quarter is 25 
>of that), and the real popular ones cost fifty cents. I am sure they cost a 
>bit more now.
>As for accessibility, I am not sure how many of them were feasible to play. I 
>was never a big fan of  street fighter style games when I could see, so I 
>guess I am not much help in that department.
>The coin ops games are probably dwindling away now, simply because the game 
>consoles are so powerful, and  relatively cheaper in the long run to own and 
>play indefinitely, it just doesn't seem worth it to justify spending the cash.
>When it comes to game length. Most of the time the magic number was three 
>lives. Of course you could increase your play time by getting really good and 
>earning extra lives, but you had to put the money and practice, practice, 
>practice.
>Some other games gave you a time limit, and of course, if you get enough 
>points you get extended time. It all depends on the game.
>The games I can remember playing are, in no particular order: pong, breakout, 
>space invaders, asteroids, pac man, Mrs. pac man, Pac man junior (this was 
>kind of a pacman/pinball hybrid), battlezone, death race 2000, sprint, outrun, 
>afterburner, zaxxon, donkey kong, Super Mario Brothers, dragons lair (this was 
>actually a  cartoon game), star trek, star wars, time pilot, galaxians, galga, 
>gorf, Mr. Do, dig dug, Operation:wolf, area 51, Dungeons and dragons, 
>gauntlet, missile command, centipede, pole position, defender, moon landing, 
>time cop, space ace (another cartoon game), star castle, tron, bad dudes, 
>double dragon, ninja gaiden, the simpsons game, the ninja turtles game, 
>robotron, smash TV, moon patrol, rygar, final fight, jackal, frogger, ghosts 
>and goblins.
>I remember playing many others, but I forgot their names. Man I blew alot of 
>money when I was a kid, lol.
>Where to find arcade cabinet games now is a good question too. In america 
>there is probably some malls that still have arcades, and I know on the jersey 
>shore on the boardwalks there is still plenty of  arcades as well. The pplace 
>to go for arcade cabinet games however  is disney at a place called quest. It 
>is a  five level building that is like one big giant arcade game, and there is 
>one floor, I am told, that has nothing but all the arcade cabinets they can 
>cram in there...and they are all free. Of course I am sure the cover charge 
>probably gets you, but just being able to play the games free seems like a 
>cool idea. I am planning to take my kids there next year so hopefully I can 
>see first hand what it is like.
>
>al 
>
>
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