Hi again Claudio,

Thomas is absolutely right here. However, I should also mention that there are vastly different levels of programming complexity that one could use. If you used C++, for instance, you would really have to know exactly what is happening at every single point in your program or else you would find that errors were cropping up everywhere. You would need to manage memory, you would need to think about synchronizing different operations that are taking place simultaneously in what is called threads, etc etc. In short, the learning curve is rather steap. If you used a simplified scripting language like Bgt, for example, you'd be able to accomplish pretty much the same thing but a lot faster. You would not have quite as much control over exactly what is happening and would have to entrust the more difficult work to the engine in question. If we take Bgt as an example, it automatically creates several threads (e.g several tasks that are executed at once) and then makes sure that they synchronize with your script. This is done in order to take advantage of the fact that more and more computer's ship with multiple cores or even multiple processors. In practical terms, this means for example that it is updating the master timer that the entire game is based around even while your script might be sitting with a message box on the screen waiting for the user to click OK. If you used C++, you would have to do all of these things yourself. Then if we get into the field of sound playback, keyboard input etc, then we reach a point where the differences between a lower level language such as C++ and a high level one such as Bgt become even more apparent. In C++ you would need to manually take care of initializing the input system, getting a hold of the keyboard device, constantly ask it for new data so that you can react to things that are changing, and so on and so forth. In Bgt on the other hand, all of this functionality is wrapped up into two simple functions called key_down and key_pressed.


I know that this sounds like a rather lengthy and not so subtle advertising attempt for Bgt, but what I'm trying to convey holds true for any high level scripting language; I just used Bgt as an example since you were refering to audio games specifically.

I hope that this made some kind of sense.

Kind regards,

Philip Bennefall
----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas Ward" <thomasward1...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 1:12 AM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] programming


Hi Claudio,
While I understand what you are saying I think you are overlooking
something very vital to game programming. In order to become a skilled
programmer you really need to understand the fundimentals of
programming first. You need to understand the technical terminology,
things such as data types, functions, classes, programming techniques,
etc. Without this writing a simple game and saying you do this, this,
and that isn't enough.  You need to know how the code works and
relates to everything else before you can create anything
constructive.
For example, you stated, "How to make an audiogame with a ship that
goes from left to right.
I am sure that a professional programmer has to look before he can program
it."
This opinion is based soully on your inexperience with programming,
and therefore really isn't true for most skilled programmers. Once a
programmer reaches a certain point in his/her education they can
create programs, including games, without having to look at someone
else's code. An example such as you suggest above is child's play for
anyone of any real skill in a programming language and isn't complex
at all even though to you it seams very difficult right now. However,
the key to understanding how to create programs without requiring
constant source code examples is understanding the fundimentals behind
how a program is designed in the first place.
I could for example write up an open source Space Invaders game, a
Guess the Number game, etc but would that really teach you the
underlying principles of the programming language I am using? Not
really. It would only give you an example of what can be done, perhaps
in a step by step manner, but such an example wouldn't teach you how
to create games on your own using your own coding style, your own
ideas, and most of all being able to draft and create a program from
scratch.  This only comes from experience and knowing what is needed
to do it in the first place. There is no quick and easy solution to go
from total newby to skilled programmer over night. It is like building
a tall building. You learn by laying a good and solid foundation and
build up your understanding and create more complex programs as you
learn.

HTH

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