Hi Chris,

I'll answer your second question first, since it leads into the other question. TOC was initially designed as a strategic board game, but it did evolve somewhat from its original concept. One of the reasons that one unit is assigned to one cell has little to do with scale, although I have used this reasoning before to justify this rule. The main reason is that TOC was designed to be used by the blind gamer along with their sighted friends and family. If you have many pieces on every cell, it is difficult to represent this on the screen's display. You can assume that cities can have more than one unit, but there aren't too many of these and you can examine them if there is any question. A Sighted person or someone using a Braille display can view the map quickly and know where all active units are without going to each cell and pressing Tab.

Now that I have said this, fighters can share cells with units of their own side. Although I argued that fighters are different since they are in the air and other units are on the ground and so they can't get in each others way, there is a much more pragmatic reason for this. Fighters initially had the problem that they were constantly running out of fuel since they were blocked by other units. You were losing more to fuel problems than enemy action. The solution was to allow them to share cells with other fighters and units as long as they did not belong to the enemy.

To answer Willem's question at the same time here, I feel that fighters are one of the most important and strategic unit types, but for other than scouting, you need lots of them. About half way through a campaign I probably have half my cities producing fighters. Why do I like them? Here are a few reasons: 1. They move fast and so you can concentrate defense and offense on a distant or vulnerable location very quickly. 2. They can share cells and they travel six cells per time unit and so you can coordinate attacks of many fighters on an enemy in just one time unit. 3. They can easily scout large areas of sea for approaching enemy ships and submarines, and once found, you can send many fighters to that spot in one or two time periods. 4. Cities far back from the enemy lines can produce fighters and bring the strength of their production power to the enemy quickly. I don't have much use for fighters early in a campaign and very seldom in complete land battles until the very end of the game, but to reiterate, when you build fighters, build lots. The Battle of Britain map really shows the power of fighters. To address your question about using fighters to bomb cities, the beta team discussed this a bit and we didn't really come up with a decision. We didn't know what to do with fighters once they passed over an enemy city. We decided that they would deliver one HP of damage as they do outside cities, and if they had a successful attack, they could continue past the city, or circle back for another attack, but what if they end their six moves while over a city, how do we handle this? We ended up deciding that in the next release we would look at having a bomber type. These would be more limited in some respects, but more valuable as a stand-alone unit. Of course, they'll cost more.


You mentioned that performing coordinated attacks are difficult, how so? Any one unit has eight exposed sides to be attacked from, and does it really matter if your second line of attacks comes a time unit later? An example might help me address the problem.


By the way, your previous two posts were great. They won't be implemented in the first release, but they will all seriously be considered for the next one. I'm tempted to implement some of them immediately, but the version 1.0 label has to be put on it some time.


David.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Christopher Bartlett" <themusicalbre...@gmail.com>
To: "'Gamers Discussion list'" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Monday, March 29, 2010 4:31 AM
Subject: [Audyssey] More thoughts on TOC air power.


Aircraft need to be able to bombard cities. The current prohibition stunts
their power quite a lot.  IF they can attack convoys, why not cities?



Also, the unit stacking rules seem odd. You can have an infinite number of
units in a city, but in a cell the same size you can only have one
non-fighter unit.  There seems to be a confusion of scale, and it makes
coordinated attacks impossible.  What is the thinking here?



               Chris Bartlett



---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 8.5.437 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/2775 - Release Date: 03/28/10 06:32:00


---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.

Reply via email to