Hi Alfredo,
Well, your question is a bit off topic for this list. However, as game
developers do have to deal with managing web sites and have to process
orders I'll answer the question for that reason.
When I mentioned owning or renting a web server I was actually talking
about an actual network server running something like Linux, Windows
Server, FreeBSD, etc. For example, my web host has a web server
running Red Hat Linux Enterprise, Apache Web Server, CPanel, MySQL
database system, Sendmail, etc. In other words it is a dedicated
server running everything required to host web sites, e-mail accounts,
internet databases, blogs, process online orders,you name it.
As for Apache Web Server it is quite accessible. I haven't used the
Windows port of Apache much myself, but I have had extensive use of
its Linux version. Mostly configuring Apache comes down to editing
configuration files in a text editor like nano or gedit and saving
your changes. Then, if apache is already running simply stop and
restart the service for the changes to take effect. Since server
administration is way off topic for this list I won't be discussing it
here, but yes Apache is accessible provided you have a screen reader
installed on your server. For Linux based servers it will probibly be
something like Speakup  if you have a shell environment or Orca if you
have a graphical environment installed.
As for processing orders there is specialized shopping cart software a
game developer can use on his/her web server to process orders. One
such software I know about is called Agora.  Most web hosts have this
software installed and can be easily configured through CPanel. Then,
it is mainly a matter of including the shopping cart scripts in your
web site.
As for automating codes that is usually done via a php script or
similar the author has scripted in his/her web site. It takes the
e-mail provided by the shopping cart like Agora, generates a code, and
e-mails it to the end user. As far as automated licensing codes being
inaccurate I guess that would depend on the script and weather or not
the developer made a mistake when creating his/her script. Generally
speaking automated systems work just fine, but if the script has a bug
then well mistakes can happen. Computers aren't perfect, and make
mistakes too.
As for Tarzan Junior it was written in Javascript, but as Philip
himself pointed out Javascript sucks when it comes to game
programming. I didn't forget about it so much as felt it wasn't worth
mentioning. There are games out there written in AutoIt as well, but
as it wasn't meant for gaming that language shouldn't be considered a
serious programming language for games.  Some do, unfortunately, but
the fact is anyone with any real programming skills at all would never
think of using AutoIt for games.

HTH

On 6/6/10, Castanedagarcia_Alfredo <casta...@hsd.k12.or.us> wrote:
> Is apache a good accessible web server? Is it accessible for the blind
> communityy? What is the best web server for a blind individual to use.
> Because I am quite interested of starting to web code, and post a personal
> webpage.
> You need not answered my question about the registration process, because my
> question was asked by someone else and it was answered. But, I am curious
> about how people design pages that can process orders, and transfer things
> like these. Is it true that automated systems generate inaccurate codes?
> Remember about a week ago I purchased Monkey business, and the e-mail I got
> had an invalid key. I want to fix this problem immediately, before the 35
> days are up.
> I think there is one more programming language3 you have forgotten about.
> Tarzan Junior was written in JavaScript.
> Alfredo.
>
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