Hi Thomas and Rhynhardt,

I'm neither for or against open source software. I am very thankful to those who write open source libraries and allow them to be used in commercial applications, as that speeds up my own development by about 500 %. But I would never make any of my games open source because of the simple fact that I don't want people to mess around with or steal my source code. I have spent a considerable sum of money outsourcing a lot of the core parts of my game engine and so it would be utter foolishness for me to simply throw that money in the sea as we say in Sweden. It is for the same reason that I protect my sounds from being altered or stolen, because I don't want the investments I have made in that department to simply be exploited. I'm happy to provide my game engine along with some open source components to do trivial things such as my menu class, my sound pool class to handle audio environments, my number speaker class to intelligently concatenate sound files to have numbers spoken, etc etc. But the real code is protected and always will be.


For my Mac port when the time comes, I will probably be using CoreAudio directly. For networking I can stick with what I already have, since ENet fits the bill for BGT perfectly and already works on Mac OS as far as I'm aware. The same goes for AngelScript.

Kind regards,

Philip Bennefall
----- Original Message ----- From: "Rynhardt Kruger" <rynkru...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 2:50 PM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Game Engines was Heli


Hi Thomas and others,

Just a few points from a probably biased user :-)
I think the idea of Open Source Software are generally miss understood.
Part of that may be because of the fact that certain groups prefer to call it Free Software, which is associated with
freeware.
Open source software is not freeware and will never be. The idea of Open Source Software is just that the source code should be open and available to any one who would like to study or modify it. That is also the reason that many people including myself prefer to use Linux. If I want my computer to say "hello" every time it begins the boot process, I can do so without having to edit some binary file with a hex editor. Also it encourage the studying of source code. Thus if someone enters the audio gaming community, he/she can immediately find out how a game engine works for instance without having to reinvent the wheel. Some people think that open source software grows faster than other software, but
that is mostly open for debate.
Nothing prevents one from selling a program under the GPL, although your users must receive the same rights under the GPL, and can for instance sell it themselves, modify it or just give it away. One thing I've thought about is to put the game itself under an open source license, and sell the sounds and/or music.

Take care,

Rynhardt

* Thomas Ward <thomasward1...@gmail.com> [110123 04:53]:
Hi Philip,

That is very good to know. As I mentioned in my earlier message to the
list I'm currently looking at replacing one of my computers with a
Mac. Recently my old desktop, we used as a family computer, gave up
the ghost over the Christmas holidays. Now, my wife and I are in the
process of discussing replacing it. If we do decide to replace it with
a Mac I'll be interested in porting my current projects, including the
Genesis 3D Engine,  to Mac OS. If you happen to release a copy of BGT
for Mac before I get there I'd probably consider buying a license for
the port.

However, that said the APIs for Linux and the APIs for Mac OS are not
that different. For example, I have a rough idea of how I'm going to
create the Mac OS and Linux version of the Genesis Engine. I'll begin
with writing a middleware library similar to Streemway that wraps
OpenAL and loads wav, ogg, and other open source file types and mixes
them with OpenAL. For things like threading, serialization, etc I'll
use the cross-platform boost library. Finally, input, networking, and
the window manager will be handled by SDL 1.2. I believe that this
would provide an excellent basis for any game engine targeting the Mac
or Linux operating systems.

Although, there is an alternative way of handling this. SFML already
has a decent networking API, supports OpenAL via sfml-audio, input
handling is fine, threading works pretty good on Linux, and the only
complaint I have is the window manager. It works fine on Linux, I hear
it works fine on Mac, but crashes the OS on Windows. So SFML sounds
like the best solution for a Mac specific engine, but I wouldn't
consider SFML for a Windows engine based on its buggy window manager.

Still I agree with you that at this point Mac is a developers second
choice in terms of operating system to support.  While Linux is fine
as an operating system most of the Linux users I know left Linux in
favor of the Mac. Plus because Mac OS is a commercial operating system
 the majority of the people using it are willing to pay money for
commercial software. All too many Linux users I know are hung up on
the free and open source view and absolutely refuse to pay for
commercial software in any way, shape, or form. They expect software
for Linux to remain free, open source, and without commercial
licensing. That is unrealistic considering the fact I have to license
music, sounds, and so on that costs me hundreds of dollars per game.
The Marxist view that all software should be free, shared, community
property is fine to a certain point, but doesn't work if we are
dealing with capitalist companies out to make a buck for everything.
Therefore since we live in a capitalist society I have to run my
software company that way to make a buck myself to continue producing
said products.

In short, I agree with you. Mac is probably my next choice as well. It
has nothing to do with weather I like Linux or not. I've just
concluded the money isn't really in it. Between the fact there are
less users their and the fact too many are hung up on Marxist idiology
it will be very hard to market a commercial product there. If I can
produce Linux versions inexpensively and make a few extra on it fine,
but Mac and Windows seam to me to be the most financially viable
markets long term.

HTH


On 1/22/11, Philip Bennefall <phi...@blastbay.com> wrote:
> Hi Thomas,
>
> Just to enter in this discussion a little. I am actually considering > buying > a Mac when I have enough money saved up. I'm not very interested in > Linux,
> so I believe that when I do eventually begin the work of porting BGT to
> another platform it'll be on Mac to start with.
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Philip Bennefall

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