I aggree with you.
I enjoy crediting software I use especially other free, comercial or opensource software,
Something like I used such and such at such a link.
This software is quite good and I like it.
I may even put a small warenty statement maybe a trademark or something, maybe the licence version used for that software, ie gpl 2.1 and its copywrite and trademark.
At most that is.
Now over that I couldn't be bothered.
Ofcause I could just include the product licencing with the product.
Most os stuff i have used have included the licence for the code they are using it on as well as their own licence in seperate files and if its that way I don't mind having another seperate file with all the stuff in it.
However coppying it all into manuals is not what I care for
However if I have to put a note about aggreeing to stuff in coppying.txt or something or to read it I can handle that.

And ofcause as long as i used the same thing I could just shove all the licences into one file, and as long as I kept those I could be cool
THe issue would be if I had to change libs or something like that.
At 07:00 a.m. 27/01/2011, you wrote:
Hi Travis,

Here are my two cents on this. I certainly agree that one should give credit where credit is due, but what I don't agree with as a whole on the open source market is how a lot of libraries force you to put in a lot of legal mumbo jumbo in your documentation rather than just an acknowledgement and a link to their website etc. The lgpl is a great example, there you have to include a long section on how they don't accept warranty etc. On top of this, since I am making an engine, the use of many libraries would force my end users to include the same legal garbage in the game that they make with my engine. I'm not having that, so I have intentionally chosen libraries that don't require you to put credits in the documentation which means that I am free to lay them out in a way that suits the format of my application and also to not force my users to include anything to do with my internal libraries in their game manuals. The bottom line is, I don't mind giving credit but I won't use libraries that strictly enforce this.

Kind regards,

Philip Bennefall
----- Original Message ----- From: "Travis Siegel" <tsie...@lothlorien.nfbcal.org>
To: <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 9:39 AM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Game Engines was Heli



Except that opensource software is supposed to be recognized as such by folks who use it. Too often, I've found programs that use opensource software, then ignore the license requirements which state that they should, can, or must mention in their docs that they are using said piece of software in their programs. I've also seen blatent commercial rip-offs of opensource products that are obviously nothing more than the opensource program repackaged, and distributed as their own product, when this is clearly not the case. That kind of exploitation is illegal, but bringing anyone to task for such things is rough, and expensive, and usually doesn't happen, and the exploiters know this, which is why they do it. For example, nvda is free and opensource, I saw a company (3 or 4 years ago) selling a screen reader of their own, which was clearly nvda, but they had renamed it, and charged $250 for it.
That is the kind of thing that is not allowed with opensource products.
Most opensource products (especially libraries)
request that you mention them in your program documentation, but some of them don't require this, simply ask that it be done, but don't demand it. My own opinion, is that if someone is using a product, especially if it was something they're using for profit, the least they can do is acknowledge where said shortcuts came from, which is generally accepted as good and honest practice in the opensource community. It's mind boggling how many times I see programs using opensource components, and there's no mention of such anywhere in the program docs. Open source is free as in free to use, not free as in free to steal and make your own. Too many commercial entities forget this point, and just rip off opensource to line their own pockets, and that's really a shame.

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