Greetings Thomas.

A lot of "accessible" games which involve combat also never use true collision detection. In many of these games, it's either you're in range and you get hit, or you're out of range and don't. There's no chance of misses, no proper evasion, no combat tactics in general. battle zone, for instance, is literally walk up, destroy space bar until enemy dies, take some damage to health or armour. In most sighted games, combat is much more realistic, with you being able to block attacks, roll, duck, jump/evade, etc. The only games I've seen use collision detection negated the potential of such a system by having a lack luster combat system. Shades of Doom, for instance, uses collision to check for bullet/melee impact, but beyond that, there's no method of tactical defence.


It's reasons like that which draw me back to my Playstation all the time. In a game like Dragon Ball Z, for instance, you can parry energy blasts, reflect them, dodge them. You can parry, dodge, evade, and counter almost everything else, too, given proper timing.

Maybe once I figure out the logistics of my own project, such a tactical game will, at least for me, be realized.

Kai

----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles Rivard" <woofer...@sbcglobal.net>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 7:27 PM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Ideas for a game


These complex movements would have to use a lot of keystrokes or other means, wouldn't they? I've heard that some gamers complain about the number of keystrokes we have to learn to play some games like Lone Wolf and GTC. Looking at the user's manuals, it seems like a lot. I haven't had that problem once I got familiar with the games, but I think that others have.

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Laughter is the best medicine, so look around, find a dose and take it to heart. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas Ward" <thomasward1...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 9:13 PM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Ideas for a game


Hi,

Agreed. Battlezone, Q9, and Super Liam are decent side-scrollers, but
side-scrollers can definitely be a lot more advanced as MOTA
demonstrates.  Beta 17 will introduce a lot more in terms of puzzle
solving, both virticle and horizontal movement, dodging attacks such
as flying arrows, ducking sword swings, and so on. There are a
surprising number of things you can do with a side-scroller to keep it
challenging and entertaining. Someone doesn't need to create  a
first-person style game to add traps, puzzles,  more complex levels,
and/or a more advanced combat system.

If I have one major criticism with most VI side-sscrollers is that
movement is usually restricted to the x axis with little to no use of
the y axis. In most mainstream games, even your walk along beat-m-ups,
there is some use of the y axis. For example, in Batman, the 1989 NES
beat-m-up game, there are walls Batman can use to jump over traps and
things like that. On the clocktower level Batman can use a wall to
help give him enough height and distance to leap over gears and things
in his way. In Double Dragon, another classic NES beat-m-up game,
there are ladders in the wharehouse level that allows you to get up to
platforms and things above the floor where there are thugs waiting to
pound you. I remember that level in particular, because I use to love
knocking Willy's gunes off the platforms to the concrete floor below.
So far we haven't seen any of this in an audio side-scroller, and
there is no reason not too.

The other major complaint is a lack of advanced combat systems. In
Double Dragon, for example, there was a number of moves like a snap
kick, reverse kick, and three or four different types of punches. In
addition to your own special moves you could duck, jump, and sometimes
block enemy attacks. It definitely wasn't as simple as enemy attacks
you attack. It was more free style and realistic than that.

Cheers!

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