On Sat, 2013-05-11 at 20:29 +0900, Jehan Pagès wrote:

> Ok. I remembered for instance years ago, when everybody started to
> make their personal website with broken html, most were dark because
> it seemed cooler. Then it was told that dark websites are harder to
> use/read and finally are not that good for the eyes. And indeed now
> nearly all big websites use light colors.

The big search engines started to penalise dark sites, so it was a money

The reason was that people would set the background to black in a
paragraph or div element near the bottom of the page and have a whole
bunch of search engine spam keywords in black on a black background that
didn't show up.

The other problem was that before CSS was widely implemented you
couldon't style forms very well, so the input fields would tend to end
up white on a white background.

Actually if you use the "evolution" mail program you may still run into
this with gtk styles in gnome 2, and also if you have a dark gtk theme
you'll find logging in to ebay trickier than before.

In general, though, dark backgrounds are good for image processing. For
text, for years ASCII terminals were made with green text on a black
background to reduce eye fatigue - or possibly because it was cheaper,
I'm not sure ;)

A lot of it will depend on your immediate environment, the brightness
and contrast of your screen, viewing distance, and the amount of blood
getting to your brain (drink water to help regulate blood pressure; take
off shoes; sit upright; exercise...)


Liam Quin - XML Activity Lead, W3C, http://www.w3.org/People/Quin/
Pictures from old books: http://fromoldbooks.org/
Ankh: irc.sorcery.net irc.gnome.org freenode/#xml

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