Ok, but why a bipartite graph? I can imagine you can have 2 or 3
coordinates associated with each vertices without actually having multiple
vertex types.


On Wednesday, March 7, 2012, Timmy Wilson <tim...@smarttypes.org> wrote:
>> while i'd expect from linlog something like an (x,y) coordinate. is
>> that correct?
>
> (x,y,z) is also common -- i think of it as extreme dimension reduction
> -- after which you're free to use your favorite gis tool --
> http://postgis.refractions.net/ -- you can also pull in tools from
> statistical mechanics/thermodynamics
>
> Without complicating the algo for efficiency -- the essence of the
> energy model is simple -- all nodes repulse each other -- connected
> nodes attract each other -- this works for any type of graph -- i'm
> using a weighted directed graph -- in which case the weighs influence
> the attractive force
>
> It's all very continuous/natural -- living in a 3d world we've build a
> lot of tools/methods to process this kind of information
>
> The problem is without efficiency methods like Barnes-Hut we have
> Cartesian(x,y) or Cartesian(x,y,z) -- because every vertex influences
> every other vertex
>
> An efficient giraph implementation would need 2 layers -- a bipartite
> graph -- assuming (x,y,z) reduction -- we would need an Octree graph
> interacting dynamically w/ our graph of interest
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 7, 2012 at 5:00 AM, Claudio Martella
> <claudio.marte...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> My personal take is that they do have similar function (they "extract"
>> communities), but they have a general different type of output. in
>> label propagation you'd end up with an id for each vertex (the vertex
>> id that is the centroid for the community each vertex belongs to),
>> while i'd expect from linlog something like an (x,y) coordinate. is
>> that correct?
>>
>> On Wed, Mar 7, 2012 at 2:45 AM, Timmy Wilson <tim...@smarttypes.org>
wrote:
>>> Thank you everyone!
>>>
>>> I would love to see a comparison of force directed layouts
>>> (specifically LinLog) and label propagation.
>>>
>>> I searched but alas nothing -- they seem to be oddly similar?
>>>
>>> The current, serial LinLog implementation --
>>> http://code.google.com/p/linloglayout/ -- uses Barnes-Hut simulation
>>> -- n*log(n):
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnes%E2%80%93Hut_simulation
>>>
>>> I guess the root question is -- do you think it's reasonable to use
>>> giraph for Barnes-Hut simulation?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 11:34 AM, Claudio Martella
>>> <claudio.marte...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> I'm not definitely familiar with the algorithm or implementation of
>>>> LinLog, I've been just a user. It should be doable with Giraph if you
>>>> can express it in terms of message-passing between vertices and
>>>> without a dependency on a global view of the graph (except for the
>>>> convergence criteria, such as total energy).
>>>>
>>>> Please consider that Giraph's data model is based on a directed graph,
>>>> this should be a quite "interesting" constraint for you, if your
>>>> implementation is going to modify energy associated with edges (you'd
>>>> have two views over the undirected edge, one in each endpoint).
>>>>
>>>> In general, a good way of doing community analysis would be to look at
>>>> algorithms that belong to the family of label-propagation clustering
>>>> algorithms.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Hope this helps,
>>>> Claudio
>>>>
>>>> On Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 3:28 PM, Timmy Wilson <tim...@smarttypes.org>
wrote:
>>>>> Hi giraph community,
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm interested in using giraph for distributed n-body simulation.
>>>>>
>>>>> Initially, i'm interested in force directed layouts -- ie, graph
drawing:
>>>>>
>>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force-based_algorithms_(graph_drawing)
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm interested specifically in Dr. Andreas Noack's LinLog energy model
>>>>> -- which performs well w/ community detection:
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.informatik.tu-cottbus.de/~an/GD/linlog.html
>>>>>
>>>>> I have a few examples of a serial implementation here:
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.smarttypes.org/
>>>>>
>>>>> The model maximizes the distance between all nodes while minimizing
>>>>> the distance between connected nodes.
>>>>>
>>>>> Without getting into too much detail, i'm curious if anyone has
>>>>> considered using giraph for force directed graph embedding (yet
>>>>> another name for it)?
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm also considering something like http://www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc/ or
>>>>> http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~scandal/alg/nbody.html -- which have fast
>

-- 
   Claudio Martella
   claudio.marte...@gmail.com

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