On 9 Nov 2004 at 11:16, nicky smith wrote:
Trease seemed to have gradually moved to the right until the 
Bannermere books 
seem very conventional to me.

I'm curious - I've only read the first 3 Bannermere books by him - 
did he come across as leftish earlier on?  
I very rarely know anything about the politics of *fiction* authors I 
read, I find it nice when I have to spend so much time thinking about 
historiographical schools and so on to just judge a book and its 
message on what I read in the novel.  But if anyone had asked me, 
based on my reading, I wouldn't have considered Trease on the left - 
as I infer you were suggesting, Nicky?

To me, Bannermere was just as semi-snobbish as most books about 
(clever) children who find themselves in the country are - doubting 
that you can get a decent haircut or clothes unless you leave the 
village etc (although that may be true - there are bad hairdressers 
and poorly stocked shops anywhere - but it is a stereotype too)
S
P
O
I
L
E
R
S

B
L
A
C
K
B
A
N
N
E
R
A
B
R
O
A
D
His portrayal of the French railway strike didn't seem particularly 
sympathetic, although I appreciate we're mostly viewing it through 
the eyes of tired teenagers and a conservative headmaster.

Valerie
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