So for anyone who needs to something like this, I now know of a way to
do what I want, although it's not done by git but by Linux's 'find'
command.

Command:  find directoryName -type f -newer targetFileName

Cheers,
Jawad.



On Apr 13, 4:44 pm, jayman <jawad.a...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hello,
>
> Appreciate any help with the following:
>
> What I need:
> 1- To get the time at which the latest edit to a working repo was
> made. The change might or might not be tracked (in the form of an
> untracked file).
> 2- To get the time at which a file was added to the repository.
>
> What I want to do:
> Compare this time with times at which other files were created, so I
> know whether those files are now 'outdated' (and need to be rebuilt).
> They would be outdated because the latter depend on the content of the
> former. This is probably not the most efficient way of doing what I
> want, but I don't want it to get too complex (for example, defining
> dependencies for each file in the repo (which by the way, I haven't
> done), and then checking whether any of those defined files have
> changed).
>
> Any suggestions on a more efficient (yet simple) way of doing this are
> welcome. Thank you!
>
> Cheers,
> Jawad

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