On Aug 13, 5:12 am, David Doria <daviddo...@gmail.com> wrote:

[...]
> Then when I update something in Project1, I just do a
>
> |[dor...@localhost AllProjects]$ git pull origin Project1
>
> and AllProjects is now up to date.
It's not clear why you need to pull each branch. Note that pull does
fetch + merge, so each pull makes Git access the remote and ask for
changes. Hence doing multiple pulls in a row would only be sensible if
each of your "ProjectN" branches is hosted in its own remote
repository.
>From your last example, it's appears to not be the case, so you should
probably do one fetch followed by multiple merges:
$ git fetch origin
$ git checkout All
$ git merge origin/Project1
$ git merge origin/Project2
...

> Is there any standard way to make a "script" to pull from a whole
> bunch of projects? Or should I just make a bash script with
>
> git pull origin Project1
> git pull origin Project2
> etc
> ?
To me, it appears that if you want such automation, something is
wrong. Having N parallel branches to develop N features and/or fix
bugs is perfectly OK, but having a need to periodically merge them
_all at once_ appears to be a deficient approach. Usually you should
be careful when doing each merge except for no-brainer fast-forwarding
cases, and in your setup fast-forwards should be rare.

At least, if you will decide to write a shell script doing multiple
merges in a row, start it with
set -e
to make it crash as soon as the current merge command fails due to
conflicts.

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