Now there's an interesting use-case..

I'm new to git. I'm trying to develop a workflow for my creative writing. I 
> figure that other's must have came before me, so why reinvent the wheel?
>

Note that I don't write poetry myself.  I write every day on my worklog, but 
I just keep that in a text file, and paste it into a wiki at the end of each 
week.
 

> *
> *
> *Stay out of the way/how often to commit.*
> I can use launchd on OS X to call a script to make commits periodically 
> and/or when a file changes. Is making a commit every time a file is saved 
> too much? (I tend to save a bunch.)
>

Well, Git can certainly handle a few hundred thousand commits without any 
trouble. But each commit should have a message, which says something about 
what was changed. Without this meta-information, revision history is kinda 
worthless.

 

> *Should I have multiple git repositories or a single monolithic one?*
> I usually have several projects in the works, each individual piece (poem, 
> story) has it's own directory which I use to keep working drafts.
> I'd hate to have to remember to run git init, git add . , and setup a 
> laucnhd script, every time I start a new poem, but I would also hate to be 
> overwhelmed by navigating a huge repository.
>

The Git way is to have a repo for each project. If you're writing a book, 
that would be one repo. Writing a poem in isolation, that's one repo. There 
are tools and scripts around that can help you keep multiple repos in check. 
Here's a rough example <http://oddmundo.com/blog/joneses>. Products like 
Tower <http://www.git-tower.com/> are also good (I'm sure there are good 
alternatives for Windows and Linux too).

 

> *Is it possible to save out multiple versions of a single file? (easily?)*
> I often need to open three, four, or more versions of a file. And I 
> occasionally need to print several old versions. Can git do this? I know I 
> can use diff to compare two versions, and I can open a particular version, 
> is it possible to open/save the last n versions of a file?
>

Git can do everything :) Seriously though, you can print the contents of an 
older version using git show:

> git show HEAD^:foo.txt   (show previous version of foo.txt)
> git show HEAD^^:foo.txt  (show previous previous version of foo.txt)
> git show HEAD~20:foo.txt (show foo.txt 20 versions ago)
> git show 3692c6:foo.txt  (show foo.txt at revision 3692c6, which is a 
commit identifier from git log)
 
Pipe the result into a file for saving it.

*Is git for me?*
> Am I running into a fundamental incompatibility problem? Do I just need to 
> learn more about git? What are some good resources to look at—I'm 
> overwhelmed by the sheer number of git articles online.
>

First question: Well, I don't know. Personally, I would probably rather work 
on an OpenOffice document (I think these have some internal revision 
control) in a network drive on Dropbox.

2nd: I'm not sure. The best way is to just try it, and then post back here 
when you run into concrete problems.

Third question: If I would have to point at one resource.. 
http://progit.org/book/ 

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