On Monday, February 14, 2011 12:14:15 PM UTC+1, Thomas Ferris Nicolaisen 
wrote:
>
> So I have an old file repo/foo.txt
>
> foo.txt has undergone many changes over the years.
>
> Recently, I changed something in commit Z.
>
> Later on, others changed foo.txt again in commits Y, X.
>
> Now, I've been put to the task of "undoing" the changes I made to foo.txt 
> in commit Z.
>
> I changed other files as well in commit Z, so I can't do git revert Z.
>
> The Google answer is to do git checkout Z^ (the commit before Z). But then 
> I lose the changes committed in Y and X.
>
>
Try 'git checkout Z^ foo.txt'. 
That will put foo.txt into the state of Z^ ready to commit (all changes 
already staged).
 
HTH,
  Stefan

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