instead of linking the post-receive-email, i can copy that it to
post-receive, i will try doing this.
if i do below will replace the script will it work?
prjct-dir/.git> cat >hooks/post-receive <<END
? #!/bin/sh
? echo 'i'm working' >/tmp/myhook

On Fri, Aug 12, 2011 at 4:26 PM, Konstantin Khomoutov <> wrote:

> On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 11:06:12 +0530
> pavan kumar <> wrote:
> > once let me clarify what i'm doing.
> > as in this link
> > i changed
> > the mode of post-receive-email
> > in /usr/share/doc/git-core/contrib/hooks/ then i linked it with the
> > post-receive file in my prjct-dir/.git/hooks and then
> > prjct-dir/.git> cat >hooks/post-receive <<END
> > ? #!/bin/sh
> > ? echo 'i'm working' >tmp/myhook
> > ? END
> >
> > i got a error
> >
> > hooks/post-receive: Permission denied.
> >
> > i think this is because of the link.
> Unlikely.  Hard links are trasparent by definition, and for
> symbolic links POSIX semantics are that most kinds of accesses to the
> filesystem objects count links as transparent (and permission checking
> is not performed on the links themselves).
> Hence, if you hardlinked, check the permissions on the resulting file;
> if you made a soft link, check the permissions of the target file.
> You have to understand that to execute a script, the process must have
> both read and execute permissions, and the read permission on the
> containing directory and all its parents (this is not usually a problem
> unless you have a really botched setup).  Also note that the set of
> permissions (owner, group, or others) that will be used for checking
> clearly depends on which set the process's credentials will be mapped
> onto.  As you can see this is all about entry-level knowledge of
> Unix-like systems and has nothing to do with Git.
> Also note that the second line of your test script contains two errors:
> unclosed ' and the absence of the / before "tmp" which will make the
> shell interpret that path as relative to the current directory of the
> shell executing the script (and will most probably result in an error
> unless a directory named "tmp" happens to exist there).
> > is this the process to do a hook?
> Personally, I'd just copy the script over to the hooks directory instead
> of linking to it.  Messing with permissions on files presumably
> installed by an OS package files appears to be a wrong idea to me.

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