I would do it like this. Say I'm on the master branch:

$ git branch
* master (is tracking the remotes/trunk svn branch)

So, on this branch I have a few local commits. Let's make a new branch based 
on this one, called temp:

$ git branch temp

So, now let us bring our master/trunk back into the central subversion 
state. Remember that your work is safe in the temp branch:

$ git reset --hard remotes/trunk

Now, let's create your feature branch in subversion:

$ git svn branch featureA

and check it out and track it as a svn branch:

$ git checkout -tb remotes/featureA featureA

So, our feature branch is ready. Let's get those commits of the temp branch:

$ git merge temp

and commit them to svn:

$ git svn dcommit

Done, your local work stored safely on a subversion branch.


All this being said, maybe you would be better off just pushing the git 
branch ("temp") to a central/backup git repository. Our team does it like 
that, cause working with Subversion branches is such a pain, and we all know 
how to get stuff out of git branches.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Git 
for human beings" group.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/git-users/-/RJn6TzaqZhYJ.
To post to this group, send email to git-users@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
git-users+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/git-users?hl=en.

Reply via email to