On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 00:23:40 -0700 (PDT)
Ivan Ionut <ivan.ion...@gmail.com> wrote:

[...]
> > Well after i modified a file... after git status:
> >
> > # Changes not staged for commit:
> > #   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
> > #   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working 
> > directory)
> > #
> > #    modified:   file2
> > #
> >
> > I need to understand why it didn't show:
> >
> > # Changed but not updated:
> > #   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
> > #
> > #   modified:   file2
> > #
[...]
> And how to do it like in the book?

That's simply a textual change in how `git status` formulates the
situation you're talking about -- a bit of history diving brings this:

% git log -F -S 'staged for commit' -- wt-status.c
commit 8009d83c7e7af0a298ef858609a8201d01086396
Author: Matthieu Moy <matthieu....@imag.fr>
Date:   Tue Nov 2 16:31:19 2010 +0100

    Better "Changed but not updated" message in git-status

    Older Gits talked about "updating" a file to add its content to the
    index, but this terminology is confusing for new users. "to stage"
is far more intuitive and already used in e.g. the "git stage" command
name.

    Signed-off-by: Matthieu Moy <matthieu....@imag.fr>
    Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gits...@pobox.com>

% git name-rev 8009d83c7
8009d83c7 tags/v1.7.4-rc0~122^2~9

So the change appeared in Git v1.7.4.
Supposedly the examples in the book you're reading were recorded
using a version of Git older than 1.7.4.

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