On 10/29/12 17:31, kramer.newsreader wrote:
> I am a fairly experienced developer and I have never had issues working 
> with source control tools before git.
> 
> I take a new job.  I am working with git.  I am thinking about quitting 
> over having to use it.

I'll admit that I too took about 4 or 5 goes at learning git before
it finally sunk in and I found I could do things natively with git
that were either impossible or at least quite difficult in other VCS
tools.

Others have addressed most of your questions, but I didn't see this
one get answered yet:

> Every source control tool I have used before has an easy command that says: 
> "Use these changes right here.  Yes there are conflicts, but these are 
> correct."

You have to intercept these at the point of the conflict.  Usually a
merge or pull.  You can use the "strategy" option to say "mine,
dagnabbit!"

  $ git merge --no-commit -s ours some_other_branch
  # survey the merge results
  $ git commit -m "Merged in some_other_branch"

I don't know which other "every source control tool" you're talking
about, as I don't recall seeing (and thus haven't used) such in any
of the VCSes I've used (git, svn, hg, bzr, or «shudder» Source Safe).

That said, I almost *never* want the "ours" strategy.  If there are
conflicts, I want to review them and make an informed choice about
the result.

> Why do I have to be a source control engineer just to be a software 
> developer?

You can get by with just a handful of commands for basic activities.
 Most of my work involves just the following: init/clone, status,
log, commit, add, push, fetch/pull.  Once you have these, you can
replicate what most of my [current & past] coworkers have used
source-control for.

When you get to more advanced requirements (branching/merging,
editing history, partial commits, multiple remotes, etc), git is
there for you.  Branching/merging adds another two commands
(unsurprisingly, "branch" and "merge", though I suppose
"cherry-pick" might also be used here).  Editing history adds
"rebase" for most of what I do.  So you start off with 7-9 basic
commands, then add/learn more as your requirements grow.

-tkc



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