Once you have cloned the project, you can return to any state of it (tag or
commit). To do it, you need the tag name or the commit's hash.

To list all project tags, use the command git tag. To list the commit's
hash, use the command git log.

With the tag name or commit's hash, use the command git checkout
tagName/hash. It will return your project to the state wanted.

For example:
    tag v1.0:    git checkout v1.0
    commit 531c8dd4fb18e653d6170d367e4b23c3164d5ce0:    git
checkout 531c8dd4fb18e653d6170d367e4b23c3164d5ce0


William Seiti Mizuta
@williammizuta
Caelum | Ensino e Inovação
www.caelum.com.br


On Mon, Jul 15, 2013 at 2:31 AM, Ed Pataky <ed.pat...@gmail.com> wrote:

> If I want to use GIT to keep track of source code and documents, and use
> the tag feature to mark revisions ... suppose now developers commit version
> 1.0 to the repo .. now day to day they make changes, testers test, etc ..
> now what if someone wanted to go in and grab the last tagged version, the
> full set of files corresponding to a specific tag, is this possible? How to
> do it?
>
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