Hello,

Another approach is to try to rebase X on master. The following works only
if branch X was created from master.

$ git checkout X
$ git rebase master

As you mentioned, X is a refactored version, it is more than likely that
you will encounter merge conflicts during the process. However, if you feel
panicked at such a conflict, you can cancel your rebase and get back to the
original X branch in no time.

After you fix the conflicts, you can safely do

$ git checkout master
$ git merge X

Cheers,
Gergely


On 11 October 2013 04:21, Huu Da Tran <huuda.t...@gmail.com> wrote:

> If you really want to stay on the safe side, this would be the easiest and
> safest for you.
>
> git checkout branchX
> git checkout -b branchX-merge-master
> git merge master
>
> fix any conflicts, do your tests. Commit conflict changes. When you are
> happy, repeat
>
> git merge master
>
> Until everything is up to date. This is just if any commits are added to
> master in the meantime. When you are very happy
>
> git checkout master
> git merge branchX-merge-master
>
> And voilĂ .
>
> Hope everything is clear. I am typing on a phone. If you need more details
> or explanations, i'll get on a computer and give a more detail step by step.
>
> HD.
>
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