I would do a:

git log

You'll see a lot of lines like:

commit 113efcd0eb...
Author:
Date:

Find the date you're looking for. Then you can do a

git checkout 113efcd0eb...

which will restore the files from that commit into the working directory. I
often use a "git tag" to give that long hexadecimal commit id a reasonable
name. Oh, in the checkout, you can write in the entire 40 character commit
id, or just the first part - just enough to be unique. Since I use Konsole
on Linux, I can "cut and paste" the entire commit id from the display and
then paste it into the "git checkout" command.

Oh, you can then do what you please with the files, such as copy the
interesting ones somewhere else. You can return to the HEAD with a simple:

git checkout HEAD




On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 11:20 AM, srinivas thanneeru
<srinuqis...@gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi all..
>              I am git in my project now. I did commit for so many times.
> so how can go to a particular commit code, or previous version of my code.
>
> Appreciate your time, thanks in advance :)
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Git for human beings" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to git-users+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/groups/opt_out.
>



-- 
Wasn't there something about a PASCAL programmer knowing the value of
everything and the Wirth of nothing?

Maranatha! <><
John McKown

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Git 
for human beings" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to git-users+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/groups/opt_out.

Reply via email to