One thing you can do is run "git fsck" on the repo.  It will check
whether it thinks the repository is properly structured.

> From: Konstantin Khomoutov <flatw...@users.sourceforge.net>

> 1) Copy (literally) the whole project directory onto a
>    filesystem/storage which is in the known good state.
> 2) Copy it again somewhere else to have a "reference" "post-mortem"
>    snapshot.
> 
>    Any recovery procedures are then to be taken on the copy obtained on
>    step (1).  If you think you've spoiled it during the steps you'll
>    be carying, just replace it with the copy obtained on step (2)
>    and start over.

Actually, "If you think you've spoiled it during the steps you'll be
carying, just make *another* copy of (2) and replace (1) with the new
copy."  Do not change copy (2) until you *know* your problem is
solved.

Dale

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