Hello,

yes, basically that is the way. There is an option in recent Git called
shallow clone, which doesn't clone the whole history, only the last N
commits. You can also specify the branch name you want to use instead of
master, so using these two, you will actually get what you want.

For the second question, again, the answer is the same: yes, it is usually
done like this. However, on *NIX-like systems using filesystems that can
produce hardlinks, there is a way to clone a local (residing on the same
filesystem) repository that reuses the original's pack and object files.
However, you cannot do this if those developers work with a common remote
on a separate machine/filesystem (or at least I'm not aware of such
solution).

Best,
Gergely
On 25 Feb 2015 03:35, "Michael" <keybou...@gmail.com> wrote:

> How would someone check out a copy of branch "limonite-placer" from
> https://gist.github.com/5e037df5b5c9209885d5.git
>
> Is the only way to do a full clone of the entire history locally, and then
> check out the files you want?
>
> Equally, if two local users wanted to work on the same project, how do
> they share the same repository, or do they both have to have duplicate
> copies of all of the git objects/history and clone things?
>
> ---
> Entertaining minecraft videos
> http://YouTube.com/keybounce
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