Hello,

unless you used the infamous force push (git push -f) you have nothing to
worry about. Push will refuse to work if the remote and local repos have
diverged.

Best,
Gergely
On Mar 23, 2016 5:38 AM, "heniser" <heni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> I've done something really stupid to my git public repository.
>
> https://bitbucket.org/ryanheniser/alshaders/commits/branch/ids
>
> Now, I am uncertain what to do next, if anything. From what I gather from
> that day and the repository:
>
> Instead of moving my local repositories, I mistakenly copied it to a new
> location on my hard drive. In that new location on my hard drive, I pushed
> my commits to origin (g...@bitbucket.org:ryanheniser/alshaders.git). I got
> interrupted by a phone call--I forgot that I had copied/moved the repro and
> that I had pushed to origin. So, I stupidly pushed to origin from the old
> location.
>
> All the git literature (I recall) says one should not rewrite history on
> public repositories; So, I just live with this, right? Is it going to hurt
> anything/anyone?
>
> Kind Regards,
> Ryan
>
>
>
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