WWW-www.enlightenment.org pushed a commit to branch master.

http://git.enlightenment.org/website/www-content.git/commit/?id=68fb006d729468afb5f8bc2b37c81f82e6e5c91b

commit 68fb006d729468afb5f8bc2b37c81f82e6e5c91b
Author: Raster <ras...@rasterman.com>
Date:   Thu May 28 04:17:48 2015 -0700

    Wiki page start changed with summary [] by Raster
---
 pages/docs/c/start.txt | 6 +++---
 1 file changed, 3 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)

diff --git a/pages/docs/c/start.txt b/pages/docs/c/start.txt
index 0a67536..d5eb355 100644
--- a/pages/docs/c/start.txt
+++ b/pages/docs/c/start.txt
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ An example:
 
 CPUs will do arithmetic, logic operations, change what it is they execute, and 
read from or write to memory to deal with data. In the end, everything to a CPU 
is effectively a number, somewhere to store it to or load it from and some 
operation you do to it.
 
-To computers, numbers are a string of "bits". A bit can be on or off. Just 
like you may be used to numbers, with each digit having 10 values (0 through to 
9), A computer sees numbers more simply. It is 0, or it is 1. Just like you can 
have a bigger number by adding a digit (1 digit can encode 10 values, 2 digits 
can encode 100 values, 3 can encode 1000 values etc.), So too with the binary 
(0 or 1) numbering system computers use. Every binary digit you add doubles the 
number of values you [...]
+To computers, numbers are a string of "bits". A bit can be on or off. Just 
like you may be used to numbers, with each digit having 10 values (0 through to 
9), A computer sees numbers more simply. It is 0, or it is 1. Just like you can 
have a bigger number by adding a digit (1 digit can encode 10 values, 2 digits 
can encode 100 values, 3 can encode 1000 values etc.), So too with the binary 
(0 or 1) numbering system computers use. Every binary digit you add doubles the 
number of values you [...]
 
 ^Binary           ^Hexadecimal ^Decimal ^
 |101              |d           |14      |
@@ -434,7 +434,7 @@ So only compile the active code in when enabled in the 
compilation process.
 
 ==== Memory ====
 
-Reality is that languages like C are really a slightly more convenient and 
portable interface to the actual machine you have. That means the CPU, it's 
instructions and processing as well as memory that the CPU will access one way 
or another. Let's visualize just some of this. Imagine memory as simply a 
series of boxes than can contain a number that has a value from 0 to 255 (if 
unsigned). To do signed values we just interpret values differently. We can 
have from -128 to 127 as values. Wh [...]
+Reality is that languages like C are really a slightly more convenient and 
portable interface to the actual machine you have. That means the CPU, it's 
instructions and processing as well as memory that the CPU will access one way 
or another. Let's visualize just some of this. Imagine memory as simply a 
series of boxes than can contain a number that has a value from 0 to 255 (if 
unsigned). To do signed values we just interpret values differently. We can 
have from -128 to 127 as values. Wh [...]
 
 ^Byte ^Value ^
 |0    |01    |
@@ -493,7 +493,7 @@ Generally you allocate memory with functions such as 
''malloc()'', ''calloc()'',
 
 ==== Stack and heap ===
 
-The memory of your process, other than memory used to store the 
code/instructions loaded from disk, is primarily made up of 2 elements. The 
[[stack|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_stack]] and the 
[[heap|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_management]].
+The memory of your process, other than memory used to store the 
code/instructions loaded from disk, is primarily made up of 2 elements. The 
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_stack|stack]] and the 
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_management|heap]].
 
 The stack is managed for you mostly by the compiler and runtime. As the 
application runs, every time a function is called, a new blob of memory is 
"pushed" at the "top" of the stack. This memory contains the parameters passed 
to the function, and will contain return values from the function as well as a 
return address to go back (to read instructions from) to when this function 
returns. It is a very simple structure, and yet incredibly useful. Note that 
stack often have limited sizes (so [...]
 

-- 


Reply via email to