Le 11/08/2017 à 08:50, Davide Cavallari a écrit :
> Please help me understand how this command works. There is one case in the
> linux kernel repository that puzzles me. Let's consider patch "drm/i915/
> execlists: Reset RING registers upon resume" [1]. This patch was committed 641
> commits after version 4.8-rc2:
>
> ~$ git describe bafb2f7d4755bf1571bd5e9a03b97f3fc4fe69ae
> v4.8-rc2-641-gbafb2f7d4755
>
> So I would expect to find it in version 4.8-rc3 and later versions.
>
> However, if I search for the tag that follows (and hence contains) that
> commit, I do not find version 4.8-rc3, nor version 4.8, nor version 4.9, but
> 4.10-rc1:
>
> ~$ git describe --contains bafb2f7d4755bf1571bd5e9a03b97f3fc4fe69ae
> v4.10-rc1~154^2~44^2~178
>
> Why? Why not v4.8-rc3? This means that the patch has been included neither in
> v4.8 nor in v4.9, but only in version 4.10-rc1, right? Why so much time was
> needed, considering it was the 621st commit on top ov v4.8-rc2?

Because it was not in v4.8-rc3.
This probably means it was applied on a branch that started from somewhere 
between 4.8-rc2 and 4.8-rc3 but it was only merge into master after v4.9 was 
released


>
> BTW, what are the numbers 154^2~44^2~178 that follow the tag name?

This is due to merges. You have basically a roadmap to go up the ancestry graph.
~154 means 154 commit before the tag
^2 means the 2nd parent of this commit.
and so on...

The format is detailed (among other tings) in man gitrevisions

Nicolas

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