Except we don't hold the z coordinate in the OSM database.

There are other addressing schemes such as three words but using the lat
and long for the address is much simpler.  Encoding it with OLC gives you
the advantage of a more human friendly looking address.

There are issues which have been discussed in OSM-talk about adding tags to
the database.

In a conventional house number street address you can expect that number 4
main street will be between 2 and 6.  Unfortunately if you have no street
names and no house numbers it gets more difficult to confirm you have the
correct address using anything but a lat / long based scheme.

Cheerio John

Cheerio John

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 6:52 pm Victor Sunday, <victor.sun...@uniport.edu.ng>
wrote:

> Yes,every point on the surface of the earth is  already coded with x,y and
> z coordinates ,which to the lay man is imaginary lines of latitudes,
> longitudes and altitude.With the emerging  and advanced smart
> technology,its application maybe  represented  and accessible in various
> formats but the principles remains the same.
>
> I guess,we are on thesame page ?
>
> Victor
>
>
> On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 11:35 PM, Warin <61sundow...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> + 1 with John Whelan
>>
>> Every place already has an "address" simply called latitude, longitude.
>> The Open Location Code is simply another way of expressing that latitude,
>> longitude.
>>
>> If some platform wants to provide an interface between OSM data to Open
>> Location Code fine.
>> But I don't expect that the OSM data base will have anything other than
>> latitude, longitude inside it.
>>
>>
>> On 12/08/18 06:59, john whelan wrote:
>>
>> I think you have missed a major point.  You do not give anyone an OLC.
>> It is simply their lat and long encoded in letters.
>>
>> So every building in the world has a lat and long, it is its location.
>> This can be expressed as an OLC.
>>
>> Cheerio John
>>
>> On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 4:49 pm Blake Girardot, <bgirar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi John,
>>>
>>> I appreciate your thoughtful and informative remarks as always here
>>> and on the osm-talk thread, especially about the Open Location Code
>>> discussion.
>>>
>>> I clearly generally agree they are not a perfect solution and I am not
>>> even sure we know all the possible use cases, but they are a very good
>>> option at the moment, open source, light weight, easy to implement in
>>> tools.
>>>
>>> But I must take exception to your paragraph here:
>>>
>>> > Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its
>>> own
>>> > address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
>>> > doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to
>>> the
>>> > building.
>>>
>>> Trying out OLC in some local circumstances, driven from on the ground
>>> up in that location is fine. If they see a possible usefulness to
>>> them, by all means I will do everything I can to support them as they
>>> figure out if it is something of value to the local community.
>>>
>>> But the idea of giving every dwelling in Africa an address is not a
>>> good way to frame it. We are not giving anyone anything. If people
>>> wish to use these locally first, or operating locally I will help them
>>> to the best of my ability.
>>>
>>> But in no way do I feel we are or should be giving "every dwelling in
>>> Africa etc its own address" and I would like to make that clear from
>>> the start. This is a potential useful system that seems well suited to
>>> solve some use cases in some locations but must be really wanted by
>>> the local community and driven from the ground up, hopefully in
>>> conjunction with other local actors in the area.
>>>
>>> Cheers John,
>>> blake
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <jwhelan0...@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>> > Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing
>>> latitude
>>> > and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>>> >
>>> > It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
>>> > licence.
>>> >
>>> > It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means
>>> it can
>>> > display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
>>> > displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
>>> > necessary.
>>> >
>>> > OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>>> >
>>> > It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the
>>> near
>>> > future.
>>> >
>>> > Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its
>>> own
>>> > address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
>>> > doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to
>>> the
>>> > building.
>>> >
>>> > To make this work will require training material for example how to
>>> turn it
>>> > on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>>> >
>>> > Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude
>>> it is
>>> > embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build
>>> on
>>> > it.
>>> >
>>> > Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional
>>> resources
>>> > will be required to make full use of it.
>>> >
>>> > Cheerio John
>>> >
>>
>>
>>
>>
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