According to the info pages supplied with gcc-3.1, (CPATH is not
mentioned in documentation for 2.95.x or 3.0.x, but does exist in the
source code):

`CPATH'
`C_INCLUDE_PATH'
`CPLUS_INCLUDE_PATH'
`OBJC_INCLUDE_PATH'
Each variable's value is a list of directories separated by a
special character, much like `PATH', in which to look for header
files.  The special character, `PATH_SEPARATOR', is
target-dependent and determined at GCC build time.  For
Windows-based targets it is a semicolon, and for almost all other
targets it is a colon.

`CPATH' specifies a list of directories to be searched as if
specified with `-I', but after any paths given with `-I' options
on the command line.  The environment variable is used regardless
of which language is being preprocessed.

The remaining environment variables apply only when preprocessing
the particular language indicated.  Each specifies a list of
directories to be searched as if specified with `-isystem', but
after any paths given with `-isystem' options on the command line.


HTH
                                                                      
On Fri, May 03, 2002 at 09:50:18AM +0200, Martin Roehrig wrote:
> Hi,
> 
> as far as I've seen in the sources the environment variable CPATH under *NIX is the 
>same as INCLUDE under Windows.
> 
> Furthermore setting CPATH resp. INCLUDE seems to be equivalent to putting the same 
>paths not only to the -I but also to the -sysdirs
> options in a .splintrc file.
> 
> Could you please tell me if I understand that correctly?
> 
> Regards
> Martin
> 
> 
> 

-- 
Gordon Sadler


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