Curtis excellent post, 

 

I also scrounge lumber (logs and trees) where ever I can find it and have a 
Timberking 1220 band saw mill to process it as well as a Laguna 18HD band saw, 
a tractor with log forks, flat bed trailer and a ¾ ton 4x4 PU truck. I seal the 
log ends with anchor seal, a little goes a long way, and add a little transtint 
dye to differentiate the species. Have to admit though (hope my wife doesn’t 
read this) that it’s much cheaper to just go to the lumber yard or a 
woodworking show and buy the wood on a need be basis which would also eliminate 
the mess and storage issues. 

Cheers,

Michael Kratky

 

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com 
[mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of CURTIS GEORGE
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2016 10:37 AM
To: Legacy-Ornamental-Mills
Subject: Some Ideas

 

Hello Everyone.

there is not a lot of talk out there as of late.

This is not directly a Legacy thing, but I like to cut a lot of my own lumber 
that I use in my  shop.

As a general rule. Dried wood is work, and Green wood is fun.

So for Fun I just cut any wood that I can find, Ive found some very nice 
looking woods doing this, Like mallbeary, smoketree, and ficus trees all have 
unique quality's that you will not find elsewhere.

Many trees are not cut into lumber mainly due to the trees normally do not grow 
into a size that makes it profitable to cut into lumber. but this dose not mean 
these trees have nothing to offer to you and me.

Now cutting your own lumber can be a slow process. as a general rule of thumb, 
1" of thickness per year of drying.

The ends of the wood must be sealed as quickly as you can, to keep the moisture 
inside that tree, if the ends are not sealed the water will excape quickly 
causing cracking,making the wood less usable as it would be if dried properly.

I found this video on you-tube that I like.  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6QsqAWf6hE He makes his own sealer, I often 
use wax or old paint to seal the ends. His method is neat and cheaper than 
anything that Ive done in the past. Ive not done his method yet but I do plan 
to try it soon.

 

Now another train of thought on drying wood is, dry only what you need, Bowl 
turners use this method a lot. they cut the wood into a usable bowl while green 
and then let it dry out, and later going back to finish out the blank once its 
dry.

 

Art and I got into a debate a number of years ago on the topic of using PEG. 
(polyethylene glycerol.) His thinking was to dry out lumber, mine idea was to 
dry out a idiom after cutting.

 

Any How. I tell everyone to use Cheap stuff for play time. (go out to the fire 
wood pile for proto. typing/ play.) when I want to try a new idea out, Why 
waist good wood, that cost you money? I personally go for the free stuff. Fire 
wood, pallet wood, old furniture that I find in the garbage... to make saw dust 
that I so greatly look forward to making. ;-p

 

Just something to think about.

I hope everyone has a good weekend.

 

C.A.G.

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