A word of caution regarding those "Brush Guards", Bull Bars, etc.  Notice you do not see them as "factory installed" items.

I have been told the reason is: They may or will interfere with the proper deployment of the air bag system(s) in the vehicle.
So if you put them on your vehicle - be aware of the possible consequences if you have a front-end accident.
Be Safe!
Mac


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Bulkeley
Sent: Sep 22, 2016 6:53 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

Thank you i was wondering if they were used in the US or not

Bill

 

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Taylor
Sent: Friday, 23 September 2016 1:04 AM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

Bull bars are quite common here in Texas not just as protection from deer but hogs as well, hogs are particularly dangerous as they often roll up the hood and into the screen.

 

On Thu, Sep 22, 2016 at 6:56 AM, Michael Kratky <krat...@roadrunner.com> wrote:

You might be a “Redneck” if…

http://www.countryhumor.com/redneck/mightbe.htm

 

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of MWF
Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2016 12:04 AM


To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

Bill,
Being a "Redneck" in America is no longer necessarily a "bad" thing.  We have a TV show here - "Duck Dynasty" that has become VERY popular.  The "stars" of the show proudly subscribe to being "Rednecks" - and they will PROUDLY "Cling to their Bible and their guns"!
In some respects you could say that our "Rednecks" are salt of the earth, working class folks who more likely will drive a non-luxury vehicle - more often than not a truck or SUV.  In most cases they do not live in an urban environment; almost always its suburban or rural area for them.

And, in spite of what you may have read or think, we have "Rednecks" living in all parts of ALL 50 States!  In fact, I'll bet there are many who consider themselves one in our Group (or at least think a lot like they would).

So, if you consider yourself a "Redneck" - welcome to the club.

Mac



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Bulkeley
Sent: Sep 21, 2016 8:44 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

Looks like it’s more for show than practicality by the picture well I guess I’m a redneck both my vehicles have bull bars

On the road where I live a few are hit by cares every day mostly at night kangaroos have absolutely no road sense at night at all and jump in front of your car nearly every time they are on the side of the road

Bill

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael Kratky
Sent: Wednesday, 21 September 2016 11:43 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

No bull bars here in the northeast but in the southeast (red neck country) you’re liable to see anything.

Mike K

 

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Bulkeley
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 9:32 AM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

I get 30 to 40 kangaroos every day round my house dam things are a pain at times, they are almost tame. in Australia there is no natural predators for them so at times they reach plague proportions and have to be culled or they all die of starvation.

And no they don’t roam the streets of our towns, they like cover so paddocks near bushland is where they are usually.

But they do get on the country roads  and many get hit with cars which is why in the country many cars have bull bars on them to prevent damage how do American cars protect   against deer strike i never see bull bars on cars on the tv in the USA.

Bill

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Harvey Matyas
Sent: Wednesday, 21 September 2016 10:21 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

I live in a suburb near Milwaukee.  The deer are protected because you are can't hunt in this area.  If the deer herd gets too big, they hire hunters to thin the herd.

However, it is never enough.  Two years ago we had over 10 deer in our backyard and another time we had 4 bucks together.

They are out looking for food.

 

Harvey

 

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 6:23 AM, Bill Bulkeley <bulke...@mmnet.com.au> wrote:

Yes kangaroo is protected and not very palatable a very young one is passable but no were as nice as venison

That’s my opinion but some like it. It is mostly used in pet food here. They can be hunted under permit in my country if the numbers are high and all are threatened by no feed but that is not the case near me they serve a purpose of keeping the grass low to keep the danger of fire lower I guess I’m a roo rancher now J

A useless information fact not many know the kangaroo and the emu are 2 of the few animals of the world who don’t and can’t walk backwards, that is why they appear on my country’s emblem all ways forward never backward so I was taught at school anyway.  

Bill

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of MAX LATHAM
Sent: Tuesday, 20 September 2016 1:35 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

Yes, but venison is a dietary staple where I live. Is kangaroo a protected species? And delightfully edible?

max


From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com <legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Bill Bulkeley <bulke...@mmnet.com.au>
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 10:32 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

I used to run a few head of cattle a long time ago and barb wire was the only thing apart from electric that kept them in.

Now days all that is on my property is kangaroos and I can’t keep them out they jump over fences. I guess it’s like deer over where you are they jump fences don’t they

Bill

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of MWF
Sent: Tuesday, 20 September 2016 11:22 AM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

Bill,
Why is your property surrounded by barbed wire? 
To keep the kids in, or the animals out? Error! Filename not specified.
If it's the animals, what kind?
Mac



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Bulkeley
Sent: Sep 19, 2016 4:16 AM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

Yes I know barbed wire my property is surrounded by it I was just wondering if bob wire was a special sort .

Bill

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of MWF
Sent: Monday, 19 September 2016 4:50 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas - Barbed Wire

 

Bill,
That's a sort of "joke" - it's how a Texan (person living in Texas) would "pronounce" the term "barbed wire". 
Barbed wire is a strand-style fencing wire used to keep the animal(s) from trying to get out of the fenced in area. It is essentially two strong wires twisted around each other with short pieces of wire inserted in between the strands every 2 - 4 inches.  These short pieces stick out from the main strand about an inch and their tips are sharp - so they deliver pain if the animal presses up against it.
Have a Wonderful week.
Mac



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Bulkeley
Sent: Sep 18, 2016 11:11 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: RE: Some Ideas

Texan "bob war"?

Bill

From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com [mailto:legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of MAX LATHAM
Sent: Monday, 19 September 2016 12:56 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: Some Ideas

 

OK, Curt, as you can see, the stump has been reduced in order to fit onto the saw carriage. Also, notice a square hole. Therein lies a problem, barbed wire (Texan "bob war") is present indicating a crosscut avoiding the wire thus creating material for bowls, carving etc. The remainder is to be plain sawed with 1" at the top and bottom and a series  of cuts from 2" to 4" and allowing columns, flat slabs to bowls etc. The crotch is to be sized for the saw carriage by reducing the long leg and also a cross cut to remove yet another piece of wire then flat sawing what's left in varying thicknesses, mostly for surfaces, tops, drawers etc.

Reason for only 2 pics; IT wouldn't load anymore GBs.

The remainder of the tree is to be turned into a live edged kitchen table with crotch for legs and whatever.

max


From: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com <legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com> on behalf of CURTIS GEORGE <curtgeo...@wowway.com>
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2016 8:21 PM
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: Some Ideas

 

Hey Max.

I can only see two pictures. That stump looks very nice, any idea on how you will cut it?

 

C.A.G.


From: "MAX LATHAM" <ma...@hotmail.com>
To: legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2016 8:43:12 PM
Subject: Fw: Some Ideas

 

I, too, am a scrounger with a barn full of wonderful projects.

And as far as sealing the log end, I can't afford that much lacquer thinner for ends .... so, I frequent the paint/hardware stores for  "mis-match" and if it cost more then $5/gallon, I just wait. I use latex paint and find it to work well to prevent/ lessen checking.

Most recent is a pecan stump/root which is spalted (I think). Should make come fine saw dust!

(the third pic is a work in progress, influenced by this discussion group--thanks)

(Now I've a little else to the mix)

max

 

Ccan find, Ive found some very nice looking woods doing this, Like mallbeary, smoketree, and ficus trees all have unique quality's that you will not find elsewhere.

 

Many trees are not cut into lumber mainly due to the trees normally do not grow into a size that makes it profitable to cut into lumber. but this dose not mean these trees have nothing to offer to you and me.

Now cutting your own lumber can be a slow process. as a general rule of thumb, 1" of thickness per year of drying.

The ends of the wood must be sealed as quickly as you can, to keep the moisture inside that tree, if the ends are not sealed the water will excape quickly causing cracking,making the wood less usable as it would be if dried properly.

I found this video on you-tube that I like.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6QsqAWf6hE He makes his own sealer, I often use wax or old paint to seal the ends. His method is neat and cheaper than anything that Ive done in the past. Ive not done his method yet but I do plan to try it soon.

 

 

Now another train of thought on drying wood is, dry only what you need, Bowl turners use this method a lot. they cut the wood into a usable bowl while green and then let it dry out, and later going back to finish out the blank once its dry.

 

Art and I got into a debate a number of years ago on the topic of using PEG. (polyethylene glycerol.) His thinking was to dry out lumber, mine idea was to dry out a idiom after cutting.

 

Any How. I tell everyone to use Cheap stuff for play time. (go out to the fire wood pile for proto. typing/ play.) when I want to try a new idea out, Why waist good wood, that cost you money? I personally go for the free stuff. Fire wood, pallet wood, old furniture that I find in the garbage... to make saw dust that I so greatly look forward to making. ;-p

 

Just something to think about.

I hope everyone has a good weekend.

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Legacy Ornamental Mills" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to legacy-ornamental-mills+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
To post to this group, send email to legacy-ornamental-mills@googlegroups.com.
Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/group/legacy-ornamental-mills.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Reply via email to