Sure - push directly to master. Thanks.

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 11:55 AM Pete Batard <pbat...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Thomas,
>
> On 2020.05.22 16:21, Thomas Schmitt wrote:
> > Pete Batard wrote:
> >> That's called squashing. You should be able to find plenty of help on
> how to
> >> do that using git rebase, such as https://gist.github.com/jbub/5766366
> >
> > Ok. I'm now squashed at git push.
> > Question is whether i should push with --force or --force-with-lease.
>
> Yeah, I'm looking into that right now, but it doesn't look like the repo
> is configured to allow force, so I don't think we'll be able to achieve
> what we want. Especially, you won't be able to force-push your merged
> commit back, because of how the libcdio git server is configured.
>
> And creating yet another branch is overkill.
>
> <snip>
>
> > So what shall i do now ?
> > (There is always the option to create a new branch, copy win32.c to it,
> >   and make one good commit.)
>
> I think there's really little point in having a branch for a single
> commit we want to merge. As much as I like creating a branch for a set
> of changes, and judging by the time wastage that incurred above, we
> might as well just take the one commit and apply it straight to master
> without a branch.
>
> If Rocky gives a green light for doing that, I'll just go ahead and do
> it, as I'm pretty much set up already (I have the merged commit in my
> local and I just completed a test with MinGW just in case.
>
> So, okay for me to push that single commit straight to master?
>
> Regards,
>
> /Pete
>
>

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