I've pointed high school students through grad students at this web site
and they've always enjoyed it and learned a lot:

https://www.hackthissite.org/

This book is the best for beginners, in my opinion:

https://www.amazon.com/Hacking-Ethical-Hackers-Handbook-Fourth/dp/0071832386

Someone already sent a link to Bratus, not sure if someone already sent
a link to SEED or not (I read the digest version of this list):

http://www.cis.syr.edu/~wedu/seed/

Werewolves is what we use to teach high school students in the summer:

http://www.cs.unm.edu/~crandall/3GSE2014.pdf
"A Case Study in Helping Students to Covertly Eat Their Classmates"
http://www.cs.unm.edu/~crandall/CSET12.pdf
"Students Who Don't Understand Information Flow Should be Eaten: An
Experience Paper"

The theme of the game is, if you're not cheating you're not trying.
Unfortunately, our web site is currently down and the code is not
well-maintained, so send an email if interested.

Lastly, to help them understand public key crypto I do a food coloring
version of this for high school students....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBfamv-_do

It's one of those demos that is also effective for middle school through
grad school, I've found.  The Art of the Problem and others have some
really good videos on YouTube about cybersecurity concepts.

Jed


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