On Wed, 12 Oct 2016, Michael Kerrisk (man-pages) wrote:

> > +arguments must specify the empty set. If the "local node" is low
> > +on free memory the kernel will try to allocate memory from other
> > +nodes. The kernel will allocate memory from the "local node"
> > +whenever memory for this node is available. If the "local node"
> > +is not allowed by the process's current cpuset context the kernel
> > +will try to allocate memory from other nodes. The kernel will
> > +allocate memory from the "local node" whenever it becomes allowed
> > +by the process's current cpuset context. In contrast
> > +reverts to the policy of the process which may have been set with
> > +.BR set_mempolicy (2).
> > +It may not be the "local allocation".
> What is the sense of "may not be" here? (And repeated below).
> Is the meaning "this could be something other than"?
> Presumably the answer is yes, in which case I'll clarify
> the wording there. Let me know.

Someone may have set for example a round robin policy with numactl
--interleave before starting the process? Then allocations will go through
all nodes.

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