Hi Bruce,

profiling.cfg is just designed for powertop and oprofile.

  1 # for oprofile and powertop
  2 CONFIG_PROFILING=y
  3 CONFIG_OPROFILE=y
  4 CONFIG_FRAME_POINTER=y
  5 CONFIG_X86_LOCAL_APIC=y

Maybe split profiling.cfg and move them to their recipe is a good way.


--Hongzhi



On 8/7/19 10:43 AM, Bruce Ashfield wrote:


On Mon, Aug 5, 2019 at 11:44 PM Hongzhi, Song <hongzhi.s...@windriver.com <mailto:hongzhi.s...@windriver.com>> wrote:

    Hi Bruce,

    I see profiling.scc is included by kernel-cache/bsp/*, such as
    bsp/intel-x86 bsp/common-pc/ ... .


    My question is that is it necessary to open profiling.cfg defaultly?


We left profiling as a per-BSP decision, since production machine configurations don't want the overhead that it brings.

Not all BSPs follow the split between developer and production, but see how it is used in:

bsp/common-pc-64/common-pc-64-developer.scc:include features/profiling/profiling.scc bsp/common-pc-64/common-pc-64-preempt-rt.scc:include features/profiling/profiling.scc

If it was enabled by default, it really should be in the developer ktype and then BSPs could have the split between production and developer/debug in their definitions .. with the developer ones getting profiling by default.

Bruce



    --Hongzhi



--
- Thou shalt not follow the NULL pointer, for chaos and madness await thee at its end
- "Use the force Harry" - Gandalf, Star Trek II

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