I recently watched a YouTube clip with PO´D, from some instructional TV
program, where he played the Poulton #73 (Molinaro-dubious-very-fine)
Fantasia with "dedillo" in the final show-off. I thought that was cool, as I
play it differently. (cf. also Cat Stevens - thumb - index - raking. You
really only need two fingers, or hoofs ;~)

B.R.
G.
----- Original Message ----- From: "John Griffiths" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <lute@cs.dartmouth.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2007 2:13 AM
Subject: [LUTE] Re: dedillo


Hi Jocelyn,
No the guitarra portuguesa is closer to a cittern in its modern form
-- they still use the term viol=E3o (=vihuela in Port.) for the Spanish
guitar. Even though the current instrument is of 18th-century British
origin, the techniques for playing it are much older. They still play
"dedilho" for most passage work.

Check these:

http://www.attambur.com/Recolhas/a_guitarra_portuguesa.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_guitar

John


On 31/10/2007, at 11:45, Nelson, Jocelyn wrote:

John,

Is the Portuguese guitar you mention the 4-course like the
Renaissance guitar and the uke?

Jocelyn


From: John Griffiths [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Tue 10/30/2007 8:41 PM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: [VIHUELA] Re: dedillo

My two-penneth worth is that we have two main ways of learning about
dedillo from contemporary practice. One is from the variety of
techniques used in vihuela/guitarra-derivatives in Latin America,
such as the charango and various others. The second is the Portuguese
guitar that has continued to use dedillo technique in a manner that I
suspect is not far removed from the way that sixteenth-century
vihuelists used it.

John


On 31/10/2007, at 10:23, Eugene C. Braig IV wrote:

> At 07:00 PM 10/30/2007, Stuart Walsh wrote:
>> Is the vihuela the only instrument that uses this technique?  I
don't
>> think there is anything like it in 4 or 5 course guitar, or any
>> kind of
>> lute, technique. There couldn't be anything in the construction of
>> the
>> instrument that makes this a more likely possibility, could there?
>> And
>> hats off to Ralph Maier for actually mastering it.
>>
>> Speaking only as an amateur: the whole business is trying to get
>> the flesh
>> of the fingers to sound the strings. But the downward stroke of
>> dedillo
>> seems like a crude bash with the nails. How do you square the
>> considered
>> upward pluck of the fingers with - what could easily be- a rather
>> percussive chunk downwards with the thumb?
>
> Dedillo as tremolo is pretty common to modern classical guitar and
> perhaps
> even more common to flamenco (and, as Bill has offered, to chordal
> charango
> technique).
>
> I'm not certain how to interpret your latter paragraph, Stuart.  The
> potential imbalance in tone is between the typical full-voiced
> upstroke of
> nail/flesh against the thinner-voiced downstroke of the same
> finger, back
> of nail only.  To quote the fine detail of Ralph's article:
> [W]hen commencing a section of passage-work where dedillo has been
> indicated in the tablature, or where the passage seems well-suited
> to this
> type of articulation, the vihuelist begins with an upward stroke on
> the
> accented beat with the fleshy side of the index finger. During the
> subsequent release of the finger to its original starting point (in
> other
> words, the downstroke), the vihuelist articulates the string again,
> now
> with nail side of the finger.
>
> I don't necessarily think it needs to balance.  I think the strong-
> weak
> pulse is a feature of dedillo to be exploited.
>
> Eugene
> --
>
> To get on or off this list see list information at
> http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Professor John Griffiths
Faculty of Music =95 The University of Melbourne 3010 =95 Victoria =95
Australia
tel (61+3) 8344 8810 =95 fax (61+3) 8344 5346 =95
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Professor John Griffiths
Faculty of Music =95 The University of Melbourne 3010 =95 Victoria =95
Australia
tel (61+3) 8344 8810 =95 fax (61+3) 8344 5346 =95 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This e-mail and any attachments may contain personal information or
information that is otherwise confidential or the subject of
copyright. Any use, disclosure or copying of any part of it is
prohibited. The University does not warrant that this email or any
attachments are free from viruses or defects. Please check any
attachments for viruses and defects before opening them. If this e-
mail is received in error please delete it and notify us by return e-
mail.




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