I agree, I have over 30 thousand photos, and they only take up about 6GB, but I 
do use google photos for a nice 2nd and backup just  in case.
> On Feb 1, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Tim Kilburn <kilbu...@me.com> wrote:
> 
> Hi,
> 
> Interesting article, but the author just seems to brush over, or minimize the 
> iCloud Photo Library.  I'm not privy to the details of Google's optimization 
> algorithms as compared to Apple's such animals in the i/Cloud Photo Library, 
> but, as an example, I have over 45,000 photos in my iCloud Photo Library and 
> it only uses up about 4 Gig on my iPhone.  I, too, have access to all 45,000+ 
> photos with facial recognition, location recognition and such.  This is not 
> to dispute or disrespect Google Photos, just to clear the possible misguiding 
> information posted here.
> 
> Later...
> 
> 
> Tim Kilburn
> Fort McMurray, AB Canada
> 
> On Jan 30, 2018, at 16:56, M. Taylor <mk...@ucla.edu> wrote:
> 
> Why can't iPhone owners just accept the fact that Google can save them?
> By h Epstein
> 
> There shouldn't be much question at this point that Apple tends to put a bit
> more thought into its products than rivals. Perhaps that's why so many
> consumer electronics companies have copied Apple products over the years.
> The good news is Apple has forced other companies to up their game, and up
> it they have. Android phone makers now put far more time and energy into
> product design and unique feature than they ever have in the past. Remember
> how ugly, cheap, and plasticky Samsung's flagship phones used to be? Now
> they're stunning, and Samsung fans have Apple to thank; Samsung simply
> couldn't continue to get away with releasing crummy plastic phones while
> Apple sold sleek iPhones made of glass and metal.
> Apple doesn't just put more thought into its products than rivals, however.
> It also seems to put more thought into how to make money. A perfect example
> is Apple's move to add exclusive features and upgrades to its more expensive
> Plus model iPhones, thus adding further encouragement for consumers to opt
> for higher-margin iPhones. Again, Samsung will finally catch up with this
> smart strategy in 2018 when it launches the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+.
> 
> Another example is storage. Unlike most other smartphone companies, Apple
> refuses to add microSD support to its iPhones. The main reason for this, of
> course, is that it forces people who want more local storage to buy more
> expensive, higher-margin iPhone models. While it's a brilliant move on
> Apple's part, this is an example of a smart business strategy that is
> decidedly anti-consumer. What many iPhone users still don't seem to realize
> or don't want to accept, however, is that Google can save them from spending
> that extra cash on an iPhone with more storage.
> 
> Google is one of Apple's top rivals in a few key areas. Of course, Android
> is the one most people focus on since Apple and Google own the two biggest
> mobile platforms in the world. Google isn't a platform company, however.
> It's a services company and an advertising company.
> Android exists as a delivery mechanism for Google's various software and
> services, and it serves its purpose quite well. But it would be silly of
> Google to confine its services to Android. Google wants access to as many
> users as possible, so it supports every popular software platform it can.
> That obviously includes iOS. Google would never confine its services to
> Android like Apple does with most of its software services. Apple is a
> hardware company and it uses software and services to lock customers in. In
> a way, Apple is Google's opposite.
> 
> That brings us to one of my personal favorite Google services, Google
> Photos. For those unaware, Google offers a service that includes unlimited
> storage for high-quality photos and videos for free. Well, for "free" - the
> price of most Google services is access to your data, of course. That's a
> price many people happily pay, myself included.
> iPhone users have been running out of storage space ever since the first
> iPhone was released more than a decade ago. In 2017, there are two main
> culprits. The lesser issue is typically the Messages app, since many people
> are unaware that all those photos and videos they receive are stored locally
> on their phones. That often adds up to gigabytes upon gigabytes of storage
> that gets gobbled up by media that will never be viewed again.
> 
> The bigger issue, of course, is all the storage that's eaten up by photos
> and videos captured by the iPhone itself.
> As smartphone camera quality continues to improve with each new smartphone
> generation, photo and video sizes get bigger and bigger. Apple's new
> high-efficiency photo format was developed to help matters a bit, but it
> makes sharing photos with anyone who doesn't also have an iPhone a huge
> pain. (Don't worry, you can disabled it by going to Settings > Camera >
> Formats and selecting "Most Compatible.")
> 
> But Apple's HEIC photo format only does so much. People still often take
> hundreds of new photos with their iPhones each week, and 4K video files can
> be massive. Even if you pay an extra $150 to bump your iPhone up to 256GB of
> storage from 64GB, all those gigabytes still tend to disappear quickly. 
> 
> That's where Google Photos comes in.
> Apple's iCloud service is nifty, but it's not free and it's actually not a
> very good solution to this problem solution. iCloud is designed to
> synchronize photos and videos across devices by default, which means these
> massive media files now occupy space on several devices. Google Photos is
> different. With this smart solution, you can upload all your photos and
> videos to Google servers and then delete them off of your phone. You'll
> still see all the thumbnails in your Google Photos app and you can browse
> through them anytime you want, then tap on a photo or video and it will
> quickly be downloaded displayed. You can also take advantages of Google's AI
> features like automatic smart album sorting, facial recognition, object
> recognition, and more. Apple has adopted some of these features in its own
> photos app, but Google's AI continues to be vastly superior to Apple's.
> 
> To this day, I continue to see friends and family get the dreaded "Cannot
> Take Photo" error because they're out of storage, or the "Not Enough Space"
> error when they try to update iOS. Emails also come in all the time from
> people complaining about how quickly they run out of storage. Google Photos
> is the answer. Download it. Use it. 
> 
> Original Article at:
> http://bgr.com/2018/01/30/iphone-x-review-photos-google-photos-fix-storage/
> 
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